Portland NORML News - Wednesday, May 26, 1999
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What happened yesterday in Salem, Oregon (A list subscriber forwards a
dispatch from Amy Klare of Oregonians for Medical Rights saying the state
senate Judiciary Committee's work session scheduled yesterday for HB 3052,
Rep. Kevin Mannix's bill that would nullify much of the Oregon Medical
Marijuana Act, was put off until 1 pm tomorrow. The delay was caused
primarily by an egregious drafting error - legislative counsel inadvertantly
left in language stating "a person may serve as the 'designated primary
caregiver' for only one person," language that was not in the compromise
agreement with OMR or in officially adopted amendments.)

From: "sburbank" (sburbank@orednet.org)
To: (dpfor@drugsense.org)
Subject: Re: DPFOR: What happened today in Salem, OR?
Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 13:24:02 -0700
Sender: owner-dpfor@drugsense.org
Reply-To: dpfor@drugsense.org
Organization: DrugSense http://www.drugsense.org/

Phil,

Here's the report from Amy. Lee Berger will be reporting soon.

Sandee

***

Hi All - The Senate Judiciary yesterday held a public hearing on HB
3052-A, but did not do a work session to send it to the Senate Floor.
There are two reasons for this:

1) We discovered that the House-passed version (which included the
compromise amendments) included an egregious drafting error. Legislative
counsel inadvertantly left in language that stated that "a person may
serve as the 'designated primary caregiver' for only one person." This
language WAS NOT IN THE COMPROMISE AGREEMENT - or in the officially
adopted amendments. Dale Penn, Marion County DA, and Kevin Campbell,
lobbyist for the Chiefs of Police Association joined me on the witness
stand to request that that language be stricken. (Lee Berger testified
against the measure as whole, and he stated his objection to the
drafting error, as well).

2) Unfortunately, by the time the committee got to our bill (2 1/2 hours
after meeting commenced, members were called to the Senate floor
session, so only one member was excused to conduct the hearing. Without
a quorum there could be no work session.

Committee counsel, Anne Tweedt, just informed me that she intends to
schedule a work session for tomorrow, May 27th, at 1 p.m., Hearing Room
C. I suspect that the committee will strike the language limiting the
number of patients per caregiver, and move it to the Senate floor with a
"do pass" recommendation. If this scenario occurs, the bill will
probably get a floor vote on Friday or Monday.

Because of the anticipated amendment, the bill will have to go back to
the House for concurrence.

That's the latest for now.

Amy
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Marcia Hood-Brown (A lengthy but ignorant example of sensational,
just-say-know-nothing fear-mongering by Willamette Week, in Portland, focuses
on the recent heroin-related death of a local 33-year-old who was "a
brilliant scholar, an eloquent writer and a beautiful woman." Despite all the
evidence to the contrary, the weekly shopper suggests it's the increasing
purity of heroin, rather than toxic street contaminants, that killed the
victim, ignoring the role of prohibition in either scenario; and implies
that eventually, everyone who uses heroin becomes addicted, which is off by
about 90 percent. Characteristically, despite an increase in heroin-related
deaths in Portland in the last few years, from 33 to an expected 162 this
year - almost as many as in all of Switzerland - the free rag fails to inform
puddle-towners about heroin-maintenance programs saving addicts' lives and
reducing social harm in that country so successfully that similar programs
are being considered in Canada, Australia, Britain and elsewhere.)

Newshawk: Portland NORML (http://www.pdxnorml.org/) Pubdate: Wed, May 26 1999 Source: Willamette Week (OR) Contact: mzusman@wweek.com Address: 822 SW 10th Ave., Portland, OR 97205 Fax: (503) 243-1115 Website: http://www.wweek.com/ Author: By Chris Lydgate (clydgate@wweek.com) Marcia Hood-Brown 1983 - Graduates from Jefferson High School 1991 - Wins fellowship to Brandeis University 1993 - Starts teaching at Portland State University 1997 - Awarded doctorate from Brandeis 1999 - Dies of heroin overdose at age 33 In the fall of 1997, Marcia Hood-Brown had the world on a string. She had just finished her doctorate in sociology from Brandeis University. She was respected, even revered, by her students at Portland State University. She had landed a coveted postdoctoral position doing research for the federal government. She was a brilliant scholar, an eloquent writer and a beautiful woman.
She was also a junkie. Last month, at the age of 33, Marcia died of a heroin overdose. There were no needle marks on her arms, no syringes in her purse - just a couple of baggies in the kitchen trash containing a few telltale crumbs of brownish powder. The news of Marcia's demise reverberated through Portland like a thunderbolt. "This came as a terrible shot out of the blue," says her mother, Elaine Fleskes. "I wouldn't believe it. I couldn't believe it. I thought it was a mistake. It had to be a mistake." Without question, Marcia's death is an extraordinary tragedy. Sadly, it is by no means unique. Across the nation, heroin overdoses are increasing at an alarming rate. In Multnomah County alone, heroin deaths more than tripled, from 33 in 1989 to 102 last year. In the past four months, the number of deaths surged another 60 percent. If the present trend continues, 160 Portlanders will die of a heroin overdose by the year's end. "How can we allow this to go on?" asks Richard Harris, executive director of Central City Concern, a local nonprofit agency that operates the Hooper Detoxification clinic. "It's an outrage." Researchers, treatment providers and law-enforcement agents say that cheaper, more potent heroin is seducing a whole new generation of users, many of whom get hooked by smoking or snorting the drug. In addition, they say, heroin addiction is increasingly reaching into the ranks of the affluent and the well-educated. "We hold an image in our minds of the heroin addict as a sort of monster. We want to believe they are out-of-control, unhealthy, grotesque people," says Harris. "It just isn't the case. The drug does not respect economic barriers." "We've got a heroin epidemic in this valley," says Dr. Walton Byrd, the medical director of Allied Health Service, a local methadone clinic. It would be foolish to pretend that the life of Marcia Hood-Brown fits neatly into any demographer's pigeonhole. But her death raises a profound and disturbing question: How did this brilliant social researcher, a woman who had dedicated her career to working with troubled women, succumb to an addiction whose consequences she had witnessed and analyzed in the charts and footnotes of a dozen academic papers? And having fallen into the jaws of the drug, why couldn't she find a way out? Marcia always had an independent spirit. "She knew her mind, and she knew what she wanted to do, and she did it," her mother says. Born in 1966 in a tiny coal-mining town on the edge of the Kansas prairie, she grew up in the rural Oregon community of Parrett Mountain, near Wilsonville. Her mother was an artist, and her stepfather worked in construction. In 1970, they built a house on five acres of woods and meadows, without plumbing, electricity or heat. That first winter, they slept huddled in sleeping bags around a wood stove. A precocious girl, Marcia took care of her younger brother from an early age. She loved to explore the woods and hunt for mice and lizards. She showed sheep for 4-H and played sax in the school band. In the recession of the early '80s, the construction business collapsed and, with it, her parents' relationship. At the age of 16, Marcia moved into an apartment in Northwest Portland with her mother. For Marcia, the city represented an intoxicating antidote to the parochialism of Parrett Mountain. The year was 1982, and children of the hippie generation had finally found an identity to call their own. Across the nation, a defiant sound - punk - was smashing through the complacent disco and bubble-gum rock that dominated the airwaves. Punk had energy, attitude and shock value. Most of all, it belonged to them. Overnight, Marcia's dark brown curls, headband, sweatshirt and jeans were replaced by a new look: raven-black hair, a black velvet dress, black leggings, combat boots, white face, cat's eyes and bright red lipstick. She wheeled around on a vintage red bike adorned with plastic flowers, and later in a '60s-era Ford Fairlane. She grew dreadlocks and became a fixture in the local music scene. "She was the Gothic queen of Portland," says Lisa Friedli-Clapie, a close friend who teaches French at Portland State. "She was the coolest," agrees Fiona Ortiz, another good friend who now works as a reporter in Mexico. Marcia was cool, but she was no nihilist. An excellent student, she graduated from Jefferson High School at the age of 17 and worked her way through college, first at Portland Community College and later at PSU, graduating with a degree in sociology in 1989. She also became active in women's issues, volunteering as a counselor at the Council for Prostitution Alternatives and at the Portland Feminist Women's Health Center, where she held women's hands while they underwent abortion surgery. "I was proud of her," her mother says. "She was my little fighter." In 1990, Marcia married Aaron Brown, a graphic-design student at Pacific Northwest College of Art; they held the wedding outside a stone house in MacLeay Park. The next year, she won a prestigious fellowship at Brandeis. Returning to Portland in 1993, she taught classes in sociology and women's studies at PSU while writing a dissertation on treatment programs for drug-addicted prostitutes. Her former students describe her in glowing terms. "I just thought she was brilliant," says Kristin Christopherson. "She inspired me to go to grad school." Marcia also encouraged several friends to complete their education. "She's one of the reasons I went back to college," says Brian Tibbetts, who is now studying English at PSU. "She believed in me more than I believed in myself." While many of her friends settled into more conventional lifestyles, Marcia remained resolutely cutting-edge. "She didn't want to be a housewife," says her friend Lisa. "She didn't want to be part of the mainstream." She loved to organize fancy cocktail parties and sumptuous vegetarian feasts at her apartment on Northeast 7th and Knott and often patronized her favorite bar, the Sandy Hut. In March 1997, she finished her dissertation and was awarded her doctorate from Brandeis. But even as she scaled new heights in her professional career, Marcia struggled with personal demons. Her marriage was falling apart. She had been rejected for tenure-track positions at several top-flight schools. Years of graduate education had left her thousands of dollars in debt. She began to have panic attacks and suffered bouts of depression. She even began to question the value of her own degree. After a 10-year hiatus, she started smoking again. One night during the summer of 1997, Marcia sat around with an old friend from her punk days, who was working as a systems administrator. He was depressed. "I had tons of money and no life," says the friend, who is now undergoing drug treatment."I kind of wanted to throw a monkey-wrench into it." Almost jokingly, he confessed that he was so unhappy he was thinking about trying heroin. Marcia didn't laugh. On the contrary, she seemed intrigued. In fact, she said she knew where she could get the drug. "I said, 'I'll buy if you fly,'" he remembers. He gave her $20. The next night, Marcia came over to his downtown apartment. She was carrying a little plastic bag containing a tiny blob of black goo. They spread it out on a scrap of tin foil, then took turns holding a lighter under the foil until the drug bubbled and gave off a thick white smoke. A few days later, they did it again. Heroin has always held a perverse fascination for people on the fringes of society. Because of its association with tragic icons from Janis Joplin to Kurt Cobain, the drug also attracts rebellious youths searching for a way to set themselves apart from the mainstream they despise. Like many young adults (including this reporter), Marcia dabbled with hard drugs in her 20s but escaped serious harm. By the time she was 31, she certainly knew the downside. She had seen friends spiral into the vortex of addiction. She had witnessed firsthand the ravages of heroin in the faces and the stories of the prostitutes she counseled at the CPA. She was "highly contemptuous" of hip junkiedom, according to her friend Fiona. Why did Marcia take that first hit? It is, of course, impossible to reconstruct her thoughts. Perhaps she believed her exceptional intellect would protect her from harm. She had, in fact, written her dissertation on the social, economic and sexual dynamics of drug addiction. Perhaps she wanted to transgress the boundary between researcher and subject, to cut through the dry formulations of academic sociology and show those tenured Ivy League squares that she knew what she was talking about. Perhaps she simply wanted a vacation from reality. "She was a little bored with her life," says her anonymous friend. "I don't believe either of us wanted to grow up." Whatever the reason, she took the plunge. As the acrid smoke filled her lungs, all Marcia's anxieties - the crumbling marriage, the unpaid bills, the rejection letters - were swallowed by a sinister wave of euphoria. Marcia's descent into addiction followed a classic progression. She was careful, almost obsessive, about keeping her friends ignorant of her little secret and continued to maintain a respectable facade at PSU, where she taught class three times a week. "I didn't notice any significant change in her at all," says former student Christopherson. Indeed, during this time she was recruited by the National Development and Research Institutes of New York City. The organization offered her a postdoctoral position doing research on female methamphetamine addicts. "She impressed me as someone who was knowledgeable and thoughtful," says her boss, Dr. Greg Falkin. She even continued her volunteer counseling work at the Council for Prostitution Alternatives. But little by little, like a meteor trapped in the gravitational warp of a black hole, Marcia's life began to revolve around heroin. By the fall of 1997, she was using it every day. In the evening, she would go over to a friend's house to buy the drug: $30 for a lump the size of a pencil eraser - just enough to get her high for the night, plus a little taste for the morning after. At first, the changes were subtle. The parties and dinners tapered off. Dishes piled up in the sink. "She started staying in bed a lot," says former roommate J.R. Pella. "I just assumed she was partying." With her research position in New York due to begin in January, Marcia quit teaching at PSU. The loss of structure in her life seemed to accelerate her slide. People around her noticed other mystifying changes. She became obsessed with her personal appearance. She complained about money. She imposed on her friends. "She wasn't the same damn person," says Lisa. Marcia struggled to break free. Several times that fall she tried to kick the habit, lying in bed, sweating and moaning, gritting her teeth to stave off the cravings for another hour. She would last a few days, a week perhaps. Then her self-control would crack; the expert on treatment modalities would pick up the phone and call her dealer. Pharmacologically speaking, heroin is a sledgehammer. Smoked, snorted or injected, it depresses the central nervous system and triggers a cascade of endorphins in the brain, producing an intense high that can linger for hours. "Heroin is the atomic bomb of opiates," says Dr. Byrd. "It's a nightmare." As the user turns to the drug more often, the brain begins to compensate, shutting down its natural endorphin production. Gradually, the pleasure system withers, like an atrophied muscle, and the user becomes unable to enjoy anything except heroin. Contrary to popular myth, addiction is a gradual process. Depending on the purity of the drug and the frequency of use, it may take several months to produce acute dependence. But the longer it goes on, the harder it is to stop. "Every addict says, 'I can control the drug,'" Harris says. "And then one day they find the drug controlling them." In January 1998, Marcia moved to New York. If she had ever believed that geography would cure her addiction, she quickly discovered otherwise. As the drug's grip grew tighter, she flew back to Portland every few months, ostensibly to conduct research. In reality, she was trying to kick the habit. Ever secretive, Marcia hid her addiction from her friends and family - she would tell them she was sick with the flu - and the people close to her remained, for the most part, in the dark. "I was totally oblivious," says J.R. Lisa had no idea what was wrong until last summer, when Marcia was visiting Portland and asked her to help organize a yard sale. By the end of the day, Marcia had raised $250. Then she asked Lisa to take some vintage dresses over to a resale store and pick up some hair conditioner from Freddie's. Coming on the heels of a long list of favors, the request stuck in Lisa's craw. "I knew she was taking advantage of me," she says. "But I thought she was sick." After Lisa returned from her errand, she discovered that Marcia had left. When Marcia came home, Lisa was furious. As she remembers, the conversation went like this: "What the hell is up?" she said. "Why couldn't you wait?" "It's no big deal," Marcia replied, her voice sleepy and hoarse. "We just went to Taco Bell." "Taco Bell?! You don't even like Taco Bell!" "Well, I like it now." Marcia could hardly keep her eyes open. In fact, she was falling asleep on her feet. Suddenly, it all made sense - the midnight phone calls, the endless flu, the debts - and Lisa realized her friend was doing heroin. "I didn't know you could buy that at Taco Bell," she said. There was an awkward silence. "Lisa, I can take care of myself," Marcia said. "I've got it under control." Lisa burst into tears. In October, Summer Gunter, a 26-year-old artist, took the train from Portland to New York to join Marcia in her Brooklyn apartment. Summer had known Marcia for five years. Although Summer had heard rumors about Marcia's drug use, Marcia assured her that she had quit for good. "She told me, 'Everything will be so wonderful when you get here. We'll go out every night. It will be fabulous.'" When they met up at the train station, Summer was shocked. Marcia looked old. The vintage dresses had given way to ratty jeans, the glorious dreadlocks to shapeless fuzz. She was short-tempered and rude - "a side of her I'd never seen before," Summer says. In the cab on the way back to the apartment, Marcia started weeping for no apparent reason. Over the next few months her behavior became increasingly erratic. She racked up thousands of dollars in credit-card debts and phone bills. She adopted the name Zuleika, took out personal ads in The Village Voice and went on frequent dates. She stayed up all night, using heroin, smoking cigarettes and writing sad poems. Marcia tried desperately to get clean. Summer would hold her hand as she lay on the couch, unable to move. "I'd tell her, 'This is it - this is the last time you have to do this,'" Summer remembers. Marcia tried to enter a residential treatment program, but her insurance covered only outpatient treatment. It wasn't enough. She would get clean for a few days or weeks, then drift back to the dope. "She thought she was too smart to get hooked," Summer says. "She thought she could handle the drug. But no one can." Despite all she'd been through, Marcia seemed unwilling to acknowledge the depth of her problem. In an e-mail to her friend Fiona, sent in October or November of last year, she recited a long litany of reasons for her "cracking up," including debts, the breakup of her marriage, the stress of moving to New York, physical illness and, almost as an afterthought, her addiction to heroin. One Saturday morning last month, as Summer was getting ready to leave the apartment, she noticed that Marcia had fallen asleep on the couch, curled up next to the telephone. It was not an unusual sight. "She'd done that before," says Summer. "It didn't surprise me." When Summer got back to the apartment that evening, Marcia was still asleep. But there was something wrong: Marcia was in exactly the same position as before, and her skin was gray. "I kind of just stared at her," Summer says. "I couldn't believe it. Her head was next to the phone, and I couldn't see her face. I thought, 'Well, maybe she's suffocating.'" Summer pulled the phone away from Marcia's head just a little bit. There was an indentation along Marcia's face where the phone had been. She was dead. Many of Marcia's friends are asking themselves how they could have ignored her problem for so long - or why they didn't express their disapproval more strongly when they found out. "I'm really pissed off at myself," Lisa says. "I look back, and I kick myself for not realizing," says J.R. Marcia was buried in Skyline Memorial Gardens, in a sloping cemetery overlooking the city she had called home. Her mother bought the burial plot next to hers. "I just wanted people who walk past to know she's not alone," she says. "I hope I go to the same heaven." As Marcia's body was lowered into the ground and the first handful of dirt hit the casket, her friends realized she had been gone a long, long time. [sidebar:] Heroin by the Numbers Portland has one of the highest rates in the nation for the number of arrestees who test positive for opiates, according to the National Institute of Justice. Last year, 16 percent of adult males booked into Multnomah County Jail tested positive for opiates; for adult women, the rate was 25 percent - the highest in the nation. Percentage of male arrestees testing positive for opiates in 1998: Philadelphia 18% Chicago 18% Seattle 17% Portland 16% New York 16% New Orleans 13% St. Louis 11% Laredo 11% ALCOHOL AND DRUG HELPLINE 244-1312 ALCOHOL AND DRUG YOUTH LINE 244-1611 NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS 284-1787 NARCOTICS ABUSE 24-HOUR HELPLINE (800) 234-0420 PORTLAND WOMEN'S CRISIS LINE 235-5333 According to a 1997 telephone survey conducted by the state Office of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs, 4.6 percent of the respondents in Multnomah County admitted using heroin at some point in their lives. If the figure from the state survey is accurate - and it's worth remembering that a lot of junkies don't have telephones - it suggests that at least 29,000 Portlanders have used heroin. According to OADAP, heroin was cited as a "primary drug of choice" by 3,629 Multnomah County adults last year - a jump of 479 percent from 1988. Former Dallas Cowboys offensive lineman Mark Tuinei died of an overdose earlier this month after taking a combination of heroin and a stimulant. He was 39 years old. Fiona Ortiz wrote for WW from 1990-94 under her maiden name, Fiona Martin. *** [sidebar:] Deaths from heroin overdose in Multnomah county 1989 33 1990 40 1991 10 1992 31 1993 49 1994 69 1995 76 1996 94 1997 97 1998 102 1999* 162 * Projected figure Source: Multnomah County Medical Examiner's Office
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Drug-Prevention Programs: Worth It? (A Los Angeles Times article in the
Seattle Times says a study released yesterday by the Rand Corp., in Santa
Monica, California, estimated that even the best school-based anti-drug
prevention programs would curtail students' use of cocaine by an average of
only 8 percent during their lifetime - a result that, dollar for dollar, is
only a little more cost effective in shrinking demand than coca eradication
efforts overseas or interdiction at the border. Government officials at all
levels have been spending increasingly more on school-based prevention
programs as part of the $40 billion war on drugs, but cocaine use among
students is increasing, and the report concludes "It is not likely that with
current technology, prevention can play a decisive role in eradicating our
current drug problem.")

Date: Thu, 27 May 1999 06:23:24 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US: Drug-Prevention Programs: Worth It?
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: John Smith
Pubdate: Wed, 26 May 1999
Source: Seattle Times (WA)
Copyright: 1999 The Seattle Times Company
Contact: opinion@seatimes.com
Website: http://www.seattletimes.com/
Author: Ralph Frammolino, Los Angeles Times

DRUG-PREVENTION PROGRAMS: WORTH IT?

Although the best school-based drug-prevention programs are worth the
cost, they produce only modest results and are hardly a "silver
bullet" in the government's war on drugs, a new Rand Corp. study concludes.

The study, which focused on cocaine use, estimates that the best of
the anti-drug prevention efforts will curtail a student's use of the
substance by an average of 8 percent over a lifetime - a result that,
dollar for dollar, compares favorably with government efforts to
shrink demand by destroying coca leaves overseas or by patrolling the
border.

But the report released yesterday by the Santa Monica, Calif.-based
think tank cautions against expecting too much from prevention
programs, the full effects of which, it says, can take up to 40 years
to kick in.

"It is not likely that with current technology, prevention can play a
decisive role in eradicating our current drug problem," it says.

The report comes as government officials at all levels increasingly
emphasize school-based prevention programs as part of the $40 billion
war on drugs.

It's been an uphill battle. Drug use among students is rising, federal
figures show. The number of 12th-graders using cocaine nearly doubled,
from 1.3 percent in 1992 to 2.4 percent in 1998.

The federal government has funded a plethora of anti-drug education
programs in schools, but recent research shows that many aren't
effective, the Rand study says.

However, it focuses on two programs roundly considered to work -
Project ALERT and Life Skills - both of which teach seventh-through
ninth-graders the social skills to resist peer pressure.

The Rand study, which involved 7,600 students in 86 schools, was based
on evaluations in 1993 and 1995.

The programs have reduced the use of marijuana, says the Rand study,
which inferred an impact as well on cocaine consumption. Cocaine use
typically starts after high school and leads to relatively more
deaths, arrests and lost worker time than other drugs.
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Modest Gain Found With School Drug Programs (The original Los Angeles Times
version)

Date: Thu, 27 May 1999 19:34:55 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US CA: Modest Gain Found With School Drug Programs
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Jim Rosenfield
Pubdate: May 26, 1999
Source: Los Angeles Times (CA)
Copyright: 1999 Los Angeles Times.
Contact: letters@latimes.com
Fax: (213) 237-4712
Website: http://www.latimes.com/
Forum: http://www.latimes.com/home/discuss/
Author: Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer

MODEST GAIN FOUND WITH SCHOOL DRUG PROGRAMS

Study: Rand researchers say prevention efforts are worth the cost, but are
not a 'silver bullet.'

Although the best school-based drug prevention programs are worth the cost,
they produce only modest results and are hardly a "silver bullet" in the
government's war on drugs, a new Rand study concludes.

The study, which focused on cocaine use, estimates that the best of the
antidrug prevention efforts will curtail a student's use of the substance
by an average of 8% over his or her lifetime - a result that, dollar for
dollar, compares favorably with government efforts to shrink demand by
destroying coca leaves overseas or by patrolling the border.

But the 194page report released Tuesday cautions against expecting too much
from prevention programs, the full effects of which, it says, can take up
to 40 years to kick in.

"The bad news for prevention enthusiasts is that prevention does not appear
to be the hoped-for silver bullet," the study concludes. "It is not likely
that with current technology, prevention can play a decisive role in
eradicating our current drug problem." The report, titled "An Ounce of
Prevention, a Pound of Uncertainty," comes as government officials at all
levels increasingly emphasize school-based prevention programs as part of
the $40-billion-a-year war on drugs.

It's been an uphill battle. After hitting a trough in the early 1990s, drug
use among students is rising, federal figures show. The number of
12th-graders using cocaine has nearly doubled, from 1.3% in 1992 to 2.4% in
1998.

The federal government has tried to stem the tide by funding a plethora of
antidrug education programs in schools, but recent scientific research
shows that many aren't effective, the Rand study says.

However, it focuses on two programs roundly considered to work - Project
ALERT and Life Skills - both of which teach seventh through ninth-graders
the social skills to resist peer pressure.

The Rand study, which involved 7,600 students, was based on evaluations of
the programs in 1993 and 1995. These evaluations involved 86 schools,
including 30 in California and Oregon.

The programs have reduced the use of marijuana, says the Rand study, which
inferred an impact as well on cocaine consumption. Cocaine use typically
starts after high school and leads to relatively more deaths, arrests and
lost worker time than other drugs.

The study also attempts to establish, for the first time, a cost-benefit
ratio that compares the prevention programs with other government
enforcement efforts to curtail cocaine use. The results:

* Students who go through the prevention programs cut their lifetime use of
cocaine by 2.9% to 13.6%, with the midpoint being 7.6%.

* The benefits outweigh the costs. Every dollar spent on prevention yields
an estimated $2.40 savings in social costs, such as crime, lost workplace
hours or deaths.

* Prevention isn't nearly as cost-effective as treating drug abusers, but
it has a better pay-off than border patrols or eradicating coca leaves
overseas.

* The prevention programs could be implemented in all middle schools for
$550 million, easily affordable for the federal government. But it would
take a long time to see results: six years to show a 1% drop in the number
of cocaine users, and 40 years for a 7.5% decrease.

As such, prevention has a "modest impact" and should be considered a form
of "cheap insurance" for the next drug epidemic, whenever that may be, said
Jonathan P. Caulkins, lead researcher on the study and professor of public
policy at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.

"It's too late for prevention by itself to be enough to address the current
epidemic," he said Tuesday. "The horse is out of the barn." Caulkins
cautioned that the study, which is driven by economic models and several
key assumptions, demonstrates the uncertainty involved in pinning down the
effects of prevention programs.

Yet he added that one of the surprising findings was that prevention
programs have a large "spillover" effect. "If you prevent one person [from
using cocaine], you can short-circuit a chain reaction of initiation," he
said.

***

Fruits of Drug Prevention Programs

A Rand Corp. study released Tuesday tries for the first time to compare the
cost effectiveness of school-based prevention programs to that of more
traditional forms of drug enforcement.

Americans consume 250,000 to 300,000 kilograms of cocaine each year. Here
is how much cocaine use drops, on average, for every $1 million invested in
the following government programs:

Drug treatment programs: 104 kg

Federal law enforcement: 63 kg

Longer federal prison sentences: 36 kg

Local law enforcement efforts: 28 kg

Prevention programs: 26 kg

Interdiction, including border patrol: 20 kg

Eradicating coca plants in other countries: 10 kg

Source - Rand Corp. study "An Ounce of Prevention, a Pound of Uncertainty"
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Bob Ames Trial Postponed (An e-mail from the Sacramento medical-marijuana
patient invites supporters to his June 22 inquisition and recounts the
illegalities carried out by police during his cultivation bust. Sacramento
police apparently routinely break into drug suspects' homes in order to
search for contraband when they otherwise wouldn't have enough evidence to
obtain a search warrant. In court, at Ames' preliminary hearing, Sacramento
police admitted their department's policy is to automatically arrest all
patients, automatically kill all cannabis, and automatically destroy all
cannabis gardens without regard to medical paperwork or other evidence of
compliance with California Health & Safety Code Section 11362.5.)
Link to Bob Ames' Arraignment
Subject: DPFCA: Bob Ames Trial Postponed: 6/22/1999 To: dpfca@drugsense.org Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 20:10:45 -0700 (PDT) Cc: bob@rush.com From: bob@rush.com (Bob Ames) Sender: owner-dpfca@drugsense.org Reply-To: bob@rush.com (Bob Ames) Organization: DrugSense http://www.drugsense.org/dpfca/ Greetings, My upcoming trial on Medical Cannabis charges was postponed today until Tuesday, June 22, at 8:30 in the Sacramento Main Courthouse. After a series of seemingly endless court appearances, finally my court day is approaching. My case is typical of other cases here in the Sacramento area. Police knocked on front door, admitted they think I comply with 215, stated they automatically arrest all patients claiming a 215 defense, then broke in to conduct a warrantless search, claimed they found medical cannabis growing under a single light bulb, then five hours later they produced a warrant which mentioned nothing about the warrantless break-in nor about officer's belief that I complied with California Health and Safety Code Section 11362.5. Officers & I spent five hours waiting for the warrant, after they had broken in, discussing the Oakland Guidelines. Officers became unhappy with my describing the warrantless break-in, via telephone, to noted Oakland 215 Criminal Defense Attorney William G. "Bill" Panzer, and officers revoked my "telephone privileges" and even wouldn't let me finish talking to "my attorney" in private. Officers insisted on listening in on the entire call from Mr. Panzer. After destroying my residence and taking me to jail, followed by a series of endless court appearances where absolutely nothing happens, finally my trial date approaches. I'm represented by Sacramento Criminal Defense Attorney Joe Farina, who was the Libertarian Party's cantidate for California Attorney General in the 1998 November General Election. Ryan Landers, Sancramento Medical Cannabis Spokesman, has also attended all of my endless court hearings. Ryan attends court dates for several Sacramento-area patients, including myself. Mine is another of those Sacramento cases which we need to watch very closely. Police claim to have only found one light bulb and only 32 plants. Police admitted 215 compliance before breaking in without a warrant. Police misrepresented facts (215, breaking in) to obtain the warrant. Police openly admit complete disregard for California Health & Safety Code Section 11362.5, also known as the Compassionate Use Act of 1996, and also originally known as Proposition 215. Before trial, we're having a "warrant suppression" hearing on this particular issue of breaking in without a warrant. Two seperate Sacramento Police officers have been terminated for this particular crime, after my arrest last October, and I'm pretty sure that at least one of those terminated officers was at my residence and was involved with my arrest. Sacramento Police officers apparently routinely break-in to drug suspects' homes in order to search for contraband when they otherwise wouldn't have enough evidence to obtain a search warrant from a magistrate. In court, at my preliminary hearing, Sacramento Police admitted that it is the policy of the Sacramento Police Department to automatically ARREST all patients, automatically KILL all cannabis, and automatically DESTROY all cannabis gardens, all without regard to medical paperwork or other evidence of apparant compliance with California Health & Safety Code Section 11362.5. ARREST, KILL, & DESTROY, and then "let the courts sort it out". This is Sacramento's implementation plan for California's Compassionate Use Act of 1996. So, apparently in Sacramento, it would seem that: Compassion = ARREST, KILL, DESTORY Even though police said "I believe he was growing it for himself and to give it away to others for free" at the preliminary hearing, the judge failed to dismiss the preposterous "intent to sell" charge, so I'm facing two "serious" felony charges, cultivation and intent to sell. Conviction on either or both charges would automatically constitute "strikes" for the purposes of sentencing for subsequent felonies. Anyway, we hope to see you here in Sacramento in late June and/or early July for my trial, presently scheduled to begin June 22 at 8:30AM in Sacramento's Main Courthouse, to be assigned out of department 8. Have a great day and keep the faith. Bob Ames bob@rush.com 916-991-0585
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The War On Drugs, The Mendo Front (The Anderson Valley Advertiser, in
Boonville, California, continues its excellent coverage of alleged outrageous
government conduct by the DEA and Special Agent Mark Nelson in their pursuit
of Redwood Valley resident John Dalton, 44. At a federal court hearing last
Wednesday and Thursday in San Francisco, prosecutors and law enforcement
easily lived up to their reputation with true-to-form disregard for the
rules. U.S. District Court Judge Susan Illston will decide soon whether to
proceed with Dalton's trial, scheduled to start Aug. 16. If the government is
successful, he faces 30 years to life. But there isn't a single piece of
physical evidence linking him to marijuana cultivation. It's a conspiracy
case. The evidence amassed by the DEA consists of the dubious testimony of
snitches against an expert mechanic and unassuming, long-time resident of
Mendocino County.)

From: ekomp@earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 01 Jun 1999 11:53:58 -0700
To: dpfca@drugsense.org
Subject: DPFCA: MN: US CA: The War On Drugs, The Mendo Front
Sender: owner-dpfca@drugsense.org
Reply-To: ekomp@earthlink.net
Organization: DrugSense http://www.drugsense.org/dpfca/
Newshawk: Combex east@aol.com
Pubdate: Wed, 26 May 1999
Source: Anderson Valley Advertiser (CA)
Copyright: Anderson Valley Advertiser
Contact: ava@pacific.net
Fax: 707-895-3355
Author: Mark Heimann

THE WAR ON DRUGS, THE MENDO FRONT

In a San Francisco federal courtroom last Wednesday and Thursday, Redwood
Valley's John Dalton finally got a hearing to dismiss all charges against
him because of the government's outrageous conduct in its pursuit of the
man they seem to believe is the Northcoast's Mr. Big of the thriving
marijuana business. Federal prosecutors and law enforcement easily met
their reputation for outrageous conduct by behaving with true-to-form
disregard for the rules during the two-day hearing. The attentive and even
handed officiating of US District Court Judge Susan Illston, and the staid
US Marshals who serve as her bailiffs, stood between a cadre of tax-paid
cops and lawyers who seem indifferent to the standards of police behavior
which are supposed to prevail in democratic states.

The Drug Enforcement Administration has charged Dalton with a continuing
conspiracy to manufacture marijuana and has kept him in the federal prison
at Dublin without bail for two years and eight months. But the DEA itself
was on trial last week in the Federal Courthouse in San Francisco. The
government is desperately worried about this case and the desperation
shows. The DEA and federal prosecutors reached way down into their bag of
dirty tricks for even more outrageous conduct including harassment and
intimidation of defense witnesses and courtroom spectators. (They assigned
a DEA agent to follow this reporter outside the federal building. They're
not nearly as slick as they think.)

Additionally, there was a deliberate attempt to misrepresent to the court
the contents of the DEA's own policy and procedures manual; an attempt to
arrest a defense witness on a specially-contrived bench warrant out of
Mendocino County; "lost" potentially exculpatory evidence (a recording of
Victoria Horstman by DEA agent Mark Nelson can't be found); and, most
significant of all, the DEA and its two-man federal legal team didn't even
try to defend the DEA's extra-legal behavior during the investigation which
resulted in John Dalton's arrest and incarceration. Instead they relied on
the completely irrelevant strategy of portraying Dalton as a monster whose
alleged abuse drove his wife into the arms of the DEA.

If the government is successful in convicting John Dalton at trial,
scheduled to start August 16, he faces a 30-year-to-life sentence. Dalton
is 44 years old. But there isn't a single piece of physical evidence
linking him to marijuana cultivation. It's a conspiracy case. The
evidence amassed by the DEA against Dalton consists of the dubious
testimony of snitches, all of them either rewarded in cash for their input
or promised reduced jail sentences for their testimony against the
unassuming, long-time resident of Mendocino County. And there are tape
recordings obtained via the former Mrs. Dalton in ways routine in police
states but not in America.

The official title of last week's hearing was "A Motion to Dismiss for
Outrageous Government Conduct."

As reported last week, the federal prosecutors got off to a bad start
when they were required to reveal that their primary witness and lead
investigator in the case against John Dalton had committed perjury. DEA
Special Agent Mark Nelson, in an effort to conceal the date on which he
first slept with Dalton's wife, Victoria Horstman, falsified a fingerprint
card of Horstman's. Later, during a DEA internal affairs investigation of
Nelson and Horstman's affair, Nelson signed an affidavit under penalty of
perjury swearing to the bogus date he'd placed on Horstman's print card.

Agent Nelson was the first witness called by the defense when the hearing
resumed Wednesday. He was accompanied to the witness stand by his
non-government lawyer, George Niespolo. Mark Nelson is a tall, thin,
balding 36-year-old guy whose appearance is completely at odds with his
role in this case as the irresistible seducer of married women. He looks
more like a shoe salesman than an elite drug warrior. He has an extremely
high forehead that leaves little room for the rest of his nondescript
features which occupy the bottom third of his head. While Nelson's
appearance has nothing to do with the trial, most of the courtroom first
thought lawyer Niespolo, a stout, ruggedly handsome man, was the drug cop
and Nelson was the attorney. Nelson's agent-partner, Robert Price, who sat
at the prosecution table throughout the hearing when he wasn't menacing
witnesses out in the hall with a lot of ersatz tough guy eyeballing, looked
every bit the drug warrior he is. Tall, angular and crewcut clean, Price
was so stiff and straight his spine seems to have been surgically replaced
with a broomstick.

Defense attorney Tony Serra told the court that at the time in question in
1994 agent Nelson was 32 years old and had been with the DEA for nine years
representing his entire law enforcement experience. Serra brought out that
it was only the third or fourth time Nelson had supervised and been lead
investigator on a case; that he was married with two children and at the
time of meeting Mrs. Dalton (Victoria Horstman); and that his wife was
pregnant with their third child at the time of his encounters with Mrs.
Dalton.

Nelson testified that he became involved with the John Dalton investigation
in 1992, and that in February of 1994 he and another agent, believed to be
Rob Price, rented a three-bedroom house in Redwood Valley on M Road from a
Ukiah real estate broker. The rented premises were to be used as a "safe
house" for DEA agents. INS agents also stayed at the safe house from time
to time, according to Nelson. Agent Nelson said he only brought Horstman to
the safe house, also known as the COMMET house, on one occasion in
September of 1994. He admitted the visit of a civilian was "absolutely"
against DEA rules, that he initiated the contact with Horstman and picked
her up and brought her to the house when he knew no one else would be
there, and that he did not include any of this information in his reports.
"It was highly inappropriate for a DEA agent," was Nelson's contrite but
incomplete account of Mrs. Dalton's and his first tryst in the tax-funded
love nest. "How many times did you have personal contact with Victoria
Horstman prior to September 13, 1994," demanded Serra, "when it was just
the two of you alone?"

Nelson: "I think four."

Serra: "Did you advise your supervisor in advance that you planned a
private meeting with an informant?'

Nelson: "Probably not."

Serra: "Aren't you required to seek approval in advance from your
supervisors to meet privately with an informant?"

Nelson: "Yes." Serra: "And these were not exigent circumstances? There was
no emergency that you had to meet privately with Horstman?"

(Nelson doesn't answer.)

Serra: "You concede you broke the rules?"

Nelson: "Yes."

Serra: "Why one-on-one meetings?"

Nelson: "I don't know how to answer."

"Why?" demanded Serra, which brought an objection from the prosecutors.

The answer to that question came the next day near the end of the hearing
when Dalton's prosecutors attempted to introduce a page from the DEA's
manual. The single page from the DEA's top secret sleuth manual the
prosecution wished to put in evidence concerned a number of rules about
agents meeting with informants but the entire page had been blacked out
except for one line, which suggested agents "whenever practical" were not
to meet alone with informants.

Tony Serra argued strenuously against allowing the censored document's
admission as evidence, arguing that he believed the "redacted" (lawyer talk
for omitted or blacked out) portions of the document contained the relevant
rules that agents were to never meet alone with an informant without first
getting permission from their supervisors, and even then one-on-one
meetings could only take place under emergency circumstances. The
government argued the DEA's rules were secret, and if they were produced in
open court, the public, and presumably the "bad guys," would gain an
advantage over the drug warriors.

Judge Illston quickly concluded that allowing only one line of an entire
page of regulations into evidence was "self serving," and ordered the
government to produce the entire chapter on agent/informant interactions.

Agent Price relayed through the US Attorney that permission would have to
be granted at the highest levels of the DEA in Washington DC, and that the
judge could not expect an answer for five to seven days. Judge Illston was
steadfast, and ordered the DEA to produce the documents.

But by the close of the hearing, Tony Serra had secured the entire DEA
manual through his own sources, and his characterization that the DEA's own
rules state no agent is to meet privately with an informant without prior
approval means what it says. Only in a dire emergency, as when an
informant's life is in danger, does the agency permit a one-on-one meeting
with an informant and even then the agent is required to ask permission.

Serra found 15 times where Nelson had documented private meetings with
Horstman, none of them under "exigent" circumstances.

Agent Nelson denied a sexual relationship with Horstman as his reason for
breaking the DEA's rules and bringing the comely housewife to the so-called
safe house.

Tony Serra, a master of cross examination, fired questions at the outgunned
adulterer with his trademark machine-gun speed and intensity. There were
four main areas Serra covered, three of which - the events at the "safe
house" with John Dalton's wife, the bugging of Dalton and Horstman's
bedroom, and Nelson's involvement in Dalton and Horstman's subsequent
divorce - represented the basics of the government's undeniably outrageous
conduct in the pursuit of Dalton. Serra got Nelson to admit to the
incriminating facts of his lust-driven behavior while he was supposed to be
on the job.

Nelson and the DEA went to great lengths to hide the fact that Victoria
Horstman was cooperating with them against her husband. In internal DEA
reports, Horstman is referred to as an SOI (source of information), or by
the special agent number assigned to her, SR 0054. But by the time Nelson
got a search and seizure warrant for Dalton, Horstman was balking at
further cooperation and wanted to reconcile with her husband. In the
search warrant, a public document once it is served, agent Nelson refers to
Horstman by name, exposing her to potential retribution. In tens of
thousands of court cases, the feds have fought tooth and nail against
giving up their informants' identities, and the courts have just as often
said they didn't have to name names. This court-sanctioned secrecy has
often resulted in convictions where the defendant was unable to confront
his accuser. A Marshal commented that he was "disgusted and shocked" by
agent Nelson's testimony that the DEA, apparently having concluded that the
unhinged Horstman was more trouble than she was worth to them as they
chased her husband, blithely revealed her identity.

Asked if he gave up Horstman's identity so he could better control her,
Nelson said "no." He said his "boss, the Assistant US Attorney" told him to
do it, but after some meaningful stares from the prosecution table that it
was unwise of him to blame it on the government lawyer, Nelson backed off
and took responsibility for naming Horstman.

(It was at this point I noticed that Nelson no longer wears a wedding ting,
a ring Horstman made much of in her statements to investigators. It is also
when I became aware of DEA agent Rob Price's repeated trips from the
prosecution table to the hallway where defense witnesses were waiting to
testify. Later these witnesses would tell me that Price would come out to
demand they stop talking or to stop pacing the hall. Price would tell them
they were disturbing the judge. But Judge Illston never once commented on
any distraction, or even so much as cast a frowning glance at the courtroom
doors, and I never heard any noise from outside the courtroom. Neither did
the US Marshals who serve as the judge's bailiffs show any concern. The
DEA's Price kept up his petty (and failed) attempts to intimidate witnesses
testifying against the DEA throughout the two-day hearing.)

[sidebar]

A Summary Of Nelson's Testimony

He had never taken Horstman up in a helicopter, and that to his knowledge
neither had anyone else.

He paid Horstman a total of $4,800 for her cooperation, plus "tickets and
things."

He denied threatening Horstman with the loss of her children if she didn't
inform on her husband. He both admitted and denied threatening her with
prosecution for money laundering if she didn't become a snitch.

He admitted talking to Horstman about a reward payment for her continuing
cooperation, but denied the amount discussed was 10% of assets seized from
Dalton. (The DEA seized just under $1 million of Dalton's accumulated
property. Dalton is a skilled mechanic whose services are much in demand.)

He admitted agreeing to talk to the US Attorney about getting a Mustang car
seized from Dalton for Horstman.

He denied he's in a position to recommend any reward payment. (In a written
report, Nelson recommends a "substantial reward payment" to Horstman.)

He admits kissing Horstman at the "safe house" in September of 1994, but
won't admit that it was on September 14th 1994 he first stepped over the
line with Mrs. Dalton and the date he subsequently falsified in his report.
He says he kissed her first, then modifies that to say the kiss was
"mutual." Asked why he kissed her, Nelson replied, "I felt some attachment.
I felt sorry for her and I'd grown to like her. There was an emotional
attachment, and I was curious." Tony Serra shot back, "Curious to know what
it felt like to kiss another man's wife?" -- objection sustained.

He admitted he hadn't had sex in three months because of his wife's
pregnancy. "You were horny?" Serra bluntly inquired to an immediate
sustained objection from the feds. Asked if the emotional attachment was
sexual, Nelson replied, "A little bit of that."

He said he and Horstman each had one beer, but that she only drank a little
bit of hers, "maybe a quarter," and that he finished off "the other 3/4 of
her beer" as well as his. He said he was somewhat under the influence of
alcohol because he hadn't slept or eaten in the past 36 hours. He denied
knowing Horstman was an alcoholic.

He denied fondling Horstman or touching her in any inappropriate way.

He denied ever kissing Horstman on any other occasion, "Except maybe just a
peck, you know, just to say thanks".

He admits flying Horstman from Washington State to San Francisco, then
driving her from there to Santa Rosa to see a divorce lawyer. He denies
coercing Horstman to divorce Dalton. But when Serra's questions turned to
fingerprinting Horstman, nominally Nelson's reason for bringing her alone
to the "safe house" that star-crossed night of September 14, 1994, Nelson
took the 5th. Nelson proceeded to invoke his right against
self-incrimination a total of five times, and implied it another when he
simply refused to answer Serra's question.

***

The prosecution consisted of two Assistant US Attorneys, Lewis Davis, who
seemed like he might be a human being stuck with a nasty job, and Christine
Massullo, a person who obviously enjoys her work Ms. Massullo is smart,
quick-witted, and if she has any scruples against going for the kill, they
weren't on display.

When it came time for the fed's lawyers to get tough, it was Massullo all
the way. At times, especially during the breaks, Davis tried to distance
himself from his fierce colleague. He'd joke with the defense team while
Massullo huddled with Robo Rob Price plotting the next dirty trick.

On cross examination, the feds elicited the fact that former Mendocino
Sheriff Sgt. Ron Caudillo introduced the DEA's stumbling agent Nelson to
Mrs. Dalton nee Horstman, and that Horstman told Nelson she had been
physically abused by John Dalton. The prosecution also managed to posit Ms.
Horstman as an innocent girl gone awry because of Dalton's beastly
treatment of her. Tony Serra instantly dismantled the government's
presentation of Ms. Horstman as a chaste and loyal suburban housewife by
reading the transcript of a brief but explicit phone message left by
Horstman at the COMMET headquarters in Ukiah: "This is Victoria Horstman
and Mark Nelson can go free. And Rob Clark (believed to be Rob Price's
alias)- I want to suck his dick."

Serra followed his literary introduction of the former Mrs. Dalton by
calling her to the stand.

Horstman's testimony was rambling and confused, and obviously contrived and
obstructionist when it wasn't rambling and confused. She couldn't recall
when she married Dalton or when she divorced him, other than it was
"sometime in the '90s." She said she's had a lot of different therapists,
but she couldn't recall a single name. She doesn't remember when she first
met Nelson, when she started informing on her husband, what drugs she had
taken that morning (Traxene and Zoloft). But, she remembers exactly why
her memory is so bad, and never missed an opportunity to expound on it,
even when it had nothing to do with the question asked. According to
Horstman, she can't recall the 90s because "they were the Dalton years."

"It was because I was tortured at that time," Horstman testified,
suggesting the trauma of her marriage had resulted in the memory loss of
most of the decade. Asked anything connected with her life with John
Dalton - or not - and Horstman would sob that she couldn't remember. "It's
the trauma." But when she was asked about agent Nelson's avuncular kiss at
the "safe house," Horstman's recollection was vivid and detailed. (Before
court got started that day, prosecution attorney Lewis Davis assessed his
own witness, Ms. Horstman, for the Judge. "Victoria Horstman is a liar."

Which leaves the prosecution with two liars as their primary witnesses, DEA
Special Agent Mark Nelson and the woman he took to the Redwood Valley safe
house for an on-the-job boff on the pretext she was an informant.)

Horstman said it was she who initiated the visit to the "safe house"; she
who initiated the kiss; she who initiated an ensuing tongue-lunge; and that
she put Nelson's leg ("It was a pressure point") between hers on her
crotch. "I initiated that," Horstman said of the footsies. "We were
partially lying side by side on the couch."

Horstman used the word "initiated" so often in regards to her tryst with
Nelson it left the distinct impression she was either well-coached or
Nelson was so overcome by the encounter he'd been immobilized.

All the sexual prelims, other than the conceded kiss, contradicts Nelson's
testimony. At one point, not in response to a question but apparently to
explain the remarkable detail of her memory of the "kiss," Horstman blurted
out, "I'm very observant." "I needed to be near Mark because he was my
security," explained Horstman. (In a January interview she said she was
still in love with Nelson.) But to the DEA internal affairs investigators,
Horstman denied ever kissing Nelson until Nelson himself admitted the kiss.
Asked to explain her contradictory versions of events, Horstman said, "They
(internal affairs) forgot to put it in their laptop."

Asked if she drank all of the beer Nelson gave her at the "safe house,"
Horstman replied, "Yes. That's what alcoholics do," again contradicting
Nelson's testimony that his love interest has left the beer after a
lady-like sip. Horstman had written two letters to the DEA that prompted
the internal affairs investigation. In her communiques, Horstman says
Mark Nelson grabbed her, pulled her down on the couch and kissed her,
forcing his leg into her crotch, and that Nelson had told her, "Don't say
anything; it's our little secret." Horstman says she doesn't remember
writing that, then explained it was John Dalton who forced her to write the
letter and she'd composed it "so he wouldn't beat me." She says Dalton
stood over her at their home computer and dictated the letters to the DEA,
"They're Dalton's words, not mine," his former wife told the court. But
when Serra presented her with her declaration, written by his investigator,
H.B. O'Keady, and signed by Horstman, which relates eventually the same
information as her letters to the DEA, Horstman stated, "I didn't read it.
I just assumed he wrote it the way I said it. I thought he taped it," she
said of O'Keady's affidavit she'd affixed her signature to. Horstman
admitted it was her signature, but insisted she never read it before
signing. "It's all one sided," she added irrelevantly.

Throughout her time on the stand, when confronted with words she had
written or declarations she'd signed, Horstman insisted either her husband
had forced her to write them, or that the investigators had deliberately
misconstrued what she had said or that she did not read her statements
before signing. Horstman also claimed when she was cross examined by Serra,
that three masked gunmen, one whose voice she recognized as that of her
husband, had broken into her bedroom and threatened to dismember her and
her family. Horstman broke down at that point, sobbing uncontrollably, and
forced a recess.

Back on the stand, Horstman said one of the masked men put a gun in "a
sexual area" while threatening her. (Her story was remarkably similar to
one she told me in an interview. In that version, it was Dalton's brother,
"Jack," who, wearing a mask and brandishing a gun, kidnapped her and took
her up into the hills above Redwood Valley and raped her. Horstman said he
threatened to "chop off her arms and legs" and stuck a gun between her
thighs. No police report was filed on the spectacular interlude with her
brother-in-law.)

Horstman made a threatening phone call about this same time (October of
1996) to the Mendocino County Sheriff's Office which was taped and reported
on by the Sheriff's Department. The report quotes Horstman as saying "Don't
fuck with Zack. I'll cut off your arms and legs and I don't give a fuck."
Horstman admitted making this call, and said she used the same phrase -
cutting off arms and legs - because "I learned it from John Dalton." As to
the other phone call expressing her desire to free agent Nelson and fellate
agent Rob "Clark," Horstman said she probably didn't make the call because
"I don't talk like that."

Horstman also related a July 1994 incident in which she claimed Dalton had
hit her in the stomach with a baseball bat. (More on this in Deputy Dennis
Miller's testimony.) Asked by Serra why the cops didn't arrest Dalton,
Horstman said it was because "they were afraid of him."

Last Thursday, day two of the hearing, the prosecution called their first
witness, Marjorie Cusick. Cusick is the director of a Contra Costa
battered women's shelter, who, on the basis of a two hour interview with
Horstman, wrote a report diagnosing her as suffering from Post Traumatic
Stress Syndrome. But, as Tony Serra pointed out as he tried unsuccessfully
to keep Cusick from parlaying her scant training into expert witness
status, Ms. Cusick is not a psychiatrist; she's a self-described
psychotherapist with a master's in clinical psychology and family
counseling. Although she has two masters degrees, she was never required
to write a thesis, has written no papers for peer review, nor has she
participated in clinical or academic studies of the type separating the
quacks from the professionals. Cusick admitted she was not an expert on
PTSS, and that the few times she has been called as an expert witness by
the government she has always had her qualifications challenged by the
other side.

Serra strongly objected to Cusick testifying as an expert witness, pointing
out she is not an expert, by her own admission, in PTSS, which was Cusick's
diagnosis of Ms. Horstman relayed in her written report of her assessment.
However, Cusick does appear to have expertise in Battered Woman's Syndrome.
"She is going to have to change her diagnosis on the stand," objected
Serra, "to keep in her area of expertise." And that is exactly what Cusick
did.

Both in her written report and on the witness stand, Cusick simply repeated
the claims of her alleged patient, Cusick's credulity far south of
professional skepticism. Cusick said it was her opinion that Horstman
suffers from battered woman's syndrome and John Dalton is the cause of his
ex-wife's malady. Though Cusick conceded one of Horstman's primary coping
mechanisms is lying, Cusick declared, "I believe what she told me."

Cusick admitted she never talked to Horstman about her three previous
marriages, never talked to her children, and never checked out Horstman's
claims of sexual abuse by her father and brother with other relatives who
would have had knowledge of the alleged abuse. "It wasn't necessary,"
Cusick stated flatly. "Talking to other people wasn't significant for my
purpose," which had to be the understatement of the hearing and which
appeared to be based on the simple premise, "Woman good, man bad."

Nothing could shake Ms. Cusick. Not Horstman's reams of inconsistent and
contradictory statements, not physical evidence and certainly not the male
police reports suggesting the sorely put upon Dalton was in fact the victim
of Horstman's alcohol-fueled abuse. Not even the statements of Horstman's
son, who wrote that Dalton was never abusive to his mother, but that room,
a mean drunk, was often abusive to the whole family and "made things up"
when she was under the influence who believed her own lies the next day.

Cusick's response to the young man's compellingly frank testimony was that
Horstman's son was "coming out of an abusive home and already has battered
kid syndrome."

The government got their money's worth from Ms. Cusick but Dr. Freud would
probably have had his doubts about the quality of Ms. Cusick's insights.

Unquestionably, the strongest, most dramatic testimony of the entire
hearing came from Josh Corrigan, Horstman's 20-year-old son from a previous
marriage. Corrigan testified he was 12 or 13 when he first met John Dalton,
and that they lived together with his mom and sister and Dalton's son and
daughter from a previous marriage.

Josh Corrigan loves his mother, as was plainly obvious from their
interactions out in the hall and which added more pathos to proceedings
already soaked in it. Young Mr. Corrigan presently lives with his maternal
grandparents in Modesto, where he has enrolled in a community college.

The obviously pained student testified that he was very close to his
mother, and his relationship with Dalton was "really good. We would ride
dirt bikes and work on motors" he said by way of an illustration of his and
his stepfather's close relationship. He answered questions in a thoughtful
and forthright manner, but was often nearly overwhelmed by emotion. He was
obviously telling the truth.

Corrigan said he had never seen John Dalton physically abuse his mother, or
strike her or threaten her in any way. Never once did his mother complain
that John Dalton abused her, the young man said. He testified his mom
"would get drunk quite a bit. It was pretty bad." His mother's drinking
increased dramatically when she got involved with the DEA, which she told
him about at the time. Corrigan said Horstman's drinking would leave her
"confused. She would sleep a lot. When she drank, she would make up
things. It would be a lie, but the next day when she woke up, she would
believe it even though it was a lie. Sometimes she would get drunk and
stay up all night calling people, swearing at them. That's why I had to
leave."

Serra also asked Corrigan if he had ever seen Dalton hit or abuse his
mother, in any way, or if Dalton had ever told him he had. "No. Never."
Choking back tears, Corrigan described the years with Dalton as "The best
of my life. We were a family. John is like my father, every bit as much as
my blood father." Under cross examination, when asked by the ruthless
prosecutor Ms. Massullo about his statement that "they were the best years
of his Life." Corrigan broke down, crying, "I miss the old days. Can't get
it back. It's all messed up." Even she seemed moved by his testimony.

Corrigan told the judge that his mom showed him the tape recorder in her
and Dalton's bedroom.

"The recorder was under the bed on mom's side. It had wires taped to the
wall leading up behind the headboard. She said the DEA wanted her to get
things on John Dalton.

He also said Horstman had told him there were "bugs in the living room,"
but she "didn't know where they were hidden" because the DEA had put them
there.

Asked why his mother was taping his stepfather, Corrigan replied, "She told
me she would get charged with money laundering if she didn't go along with
it."

Tony Serra then asked, "Did your mom ever show you a firearms training
certificate?" "Yes. Definitely," was the young man's answer, again
contradicting the testimony of Nelson and Horstman that she hadn't
functioned as an impromptu DEA agent. "She said the DEA made her go through
firearms training and she showed me the paper."

Corrigan also told about the time his mother came home and excitedly told
him about going on a helicopter ride with agent Nelson. "She said they
were drinking beer and had flown over a pot crop, and that she had gotten
drunk and then sick and they had to bring her down."

Serra asked about Horstman's state of mind when she told her son about her
airborne beer bust.

"Nervous and still buzzing from the booze."

"When she would tell you these things," asked Serra, "did you believe she
was telling the truth?" "Well yes. There's no reason to lie to me," was
Corrigan's simple answer.

Corrigan said his mother would often tell him she was in love with Mark
Nelson and that they kissed. "She saw him quite a bit," Corrigan recalled.

Horstman's emotionally pounded son recounted the first time he met agent
Mark Nelson at the home of Chohni Kellerman-Baird, when the DEA was packing
them up for the move to Washington State. His detailed testimony about
Nelson taking him to COMMET headquarters and putting his gun on the desk in
front of the young man while grilling him about Dalton's activities
directly contradicts Nelson's testimony that he hadn't pressured the
then-high school student. Corrigan said Nelson put his hand on his leg and
told him, "(Your mother and I) have a lot of feelings for each other and
we've gotten to know each other real well."

Asked how agent Nelson's uniquely personal confidences made him feel,
Corrigan answered, "Weird. It made me uncomfortable." Then, starting to
sob, Corrigan said, "I love John like a father," and crying openly, "He's a
good dad to me."

Once the DEA had moved Corrigan, his mother and Kellerman-Baird to Blaine,
Washington, Corrigan said his mother wanted to reconcile with Dalton. "But
she said she had to divorce John or go to jail for money laundering,
that's what she said Nelson told her."

But John Dalton traced his missing family through phone records and called
up, wanting to come for a visit. Horstman immediately called agent Nelson,
who flew to Washington and gave her another tape recorder, instructing her
to invite Dalton up.

"I saw Mark Nelson the same day John came," related Corrigan. "He said he
wanted me to go to his motel and talk to John. Nelson wanted me to ride my
bike to John's motel and ask him why he was there."

Agent Nelson has denied seeing or talking to Corrigan during Nelson's
Washington visit.

"Mom said she missed John," Corrigan testified, "and wanted to move back
with him. But the DEA said she couldn't be around him." Horstman showed
her son the tape recorder she had been given by Nelson, fitted into the
bottom of her purse.

"Is this the truth?" Serra asked young Corrigan.

"Yes."

"Why did you do it? Why spy on John Dalton for Mark Nelson?" "I didn't tell
John about Mark Nelson because I was scared of them. They said not to tell."

"Have you ever been afraid of John Dalton?"

"No. Never. I wanted to see John on my own."

Corrigan testified he saw Dalton give his mother a new set of wedding rings
at their Washington meeting. "She started crying. I think she wanted to
move back."

But that same day, November 25, 1994, Horstman secretly taped Dalton as the
couple walked along railroad tracks near his motel room.

And the DEA-mugged family never did reunite.

Unbeknownst to Dalton, on November 4, 1994, agent Nelson had flown Horstman
to San Francisco where he had picked her up and had driven her to a Santa
Rosa divorce attorney to sign papers making the couple's divorce final.
The DEA had decided to rip apart what God had said no mortal should tear
asunder.

Chohni Kellerman-Baird is a junior high school teacher who volunteers at a
home where terminally ill children go to die. She now divides her time
between Washington state and British Columbia. She testified she first met
Horstman and Dalton in Ukiah in 1990, and had attended their wedding. "Tori
and I were quite close," Baird says, under the name she has used since
moving north. "I was probably her only friend."

Baird testified she was Horstman's confidant, and that Horstman had told
her all about her involvement with the DEA at the time it was going full
force. "She said she had been approached by the DEA and that they
threatened to implicate her in money laundering if she didn't help them.
She said she had to "frame - set up - John, or go to jail."

Horstman told Baird the DEA had initiated the contact. "She was very
scared and would whisper when she talked about them. She said she would go
to jail, lose her children and her job - Horstman worked at Mendo/Lake
Credit Union at the time - if she didn't cooperate with the DEA." Horstman
told Baird that Mark Nelson was her contact. "She said I was to never
repeat his name," Baird recalled.

Turning toward the judge, Baird described Horstman's relationship with
Nelson, as told to her by Horstman.

"Tori had been there before (the kissing incident.) She pointed it out to
me. She called it the COMMET house, and said it was a place she could go
and kick back with the guys and drink beer. She said she was falling in
love with Mark Nelson and that they were having an affair. She was
confused about it because she said she loved John too. She implied it was
a sexual thing, and would flip flop back and forth."

"Did she ever tell you she had sex with Nelson?" asked Serra. "Yes."

Baird said she first met Mark Nelson in the summer of 1994 at Mendocino
Collage when Horstman took her along to meet the apparently loosely
supervised federal agent.

"He wanted me to become an 'operative,'" Baird testified. "He told me that
an incident many years ago with John Dalton had 'made him look ridiculous'
and that he 'wanted to get him.' Nelson said 'that son of a bitch won't get
away with it. One way or another I'll get him.' He told me if I didn't
cooperate I would lose my children and he would put me in jail."

But Baird didn't cooperate with the DEA, though she led them to believe
she was, and was allowed to attend subsequent meetings with Nelson and
Horstman. She testified Nelson encouraged them to take a hunter's safety
class ("We went three times"), and that Nelson told Horstman "it was a good
idea to get a gun." Horstman told Baird she "wanted to have a gun so she
could kill John and make it look like self defense." Horstman's plan, Baird
testified, was to "make John angry and then shoot him. She said "Then this
whole mess will be over'."

Baird testified to seeing Horstman and Nelson hug and kiss on several
occasions - at the collage and at the credit union where Horstman then
worked and where she'd also seen the pair exchange gifts. "They were long
kisses," Baird elaborated.

Chonhi Baird's damning testimony included an account of an incident at her
house where Horstman, drunk, fell repeatedly and then stood in front of her
pressing her fingers into her own arm until they left marks. When Baird
asked why she was doing that, Horstman replied, "It's so I can document
abuse by John and send him to jail."

Asked by Serra if Dalton ever hit Horstman, or if Horstman ever told her he
did, Baird emphatically replied, "Never."

Baird went on to say that "Four or five man wearing blue jackets that said
FBI in yellow letters on the back" packed her and Horstman up for the move
to Washington, and that Nelson took Josh Corrigan away in his car "for about
45 minutes."

Once established in Blaine on the Canadian border, Baird said Mark Nelson
would call daily. "Nelson would hound her," as Baird remembered the
agent's calls which she listened to over the speakerphone. "He'd tell her,
'You've got to start divorce proceedings. You can't testify against John
until you divorce him.' He told me the same thing, and that if Tori didn't
divorce John she would go to jail. But Tori said she didn't really want a
divorce. Nelson gave her the money to fly back to California for the divorce."

When Dalton came up to Washington to see his wife, Nelson told Horstman, in
front of Baird, that she had to get incriminating info on Dalton "even if
you have to sleep with him."

Baird said she saw the tape recorder Nelson had given Horstman, and
accurately described it. She also saw the rings Dalton gave his wife. "She
was very proud of them. She didn't want to go through with it. She still
loved John but she was playing both sides. She would tell me how much she
liked sleeping with John."

Baird testified Horstman was a hard-core alcoholic who used to hide cases
of wine from her husband. "She is a very mean drunk, very dramatic," said
Baird. "When drinking she would say things she shouldn't, like that John
abused her. I knew that wasn't true."

Asked how she knew Horstman hadn't been mistreated by Dalton, Baird
described the time she picked Horstman up at the Ukiah Hospital.

"The cops were there and she had been drinking. She was on probation for
drunk driving and wasn't supposed to drink. She had me tell the cops it
was wine vinegar from her salad and they released her to my custody. Tori
claimed John had beaten her with a baseball bat. I was really pissed about
it, but when I took her to my house and undressed her and helped her take a
shower, there wasn't a mark on her. Later, I went to John's house to talk
to him about it and he had this big bloody lump on his head."

Prosecutor Massullo started the cross-examination of Baird by asking if she
was on probation. Baird looked puzzled and answered, "No."

"Do you have a bench warrant out for your arrest?" demanded Massullo.

"Certainly not," was Baird's indignant reply. Massullo then whipped out a
bench warrant for Baird's arrest on an outstanding warrant from Mendocino
County, saying the warrant discredited Baird's testimony.

Tony Serra bellowed an objection, demanding, "Let me see that," as he
snatched the paper from Massullo's hand. "This is a traffic ticket, for
Christ sakes," roared Serra. "Only prior felonies and misdemeanor crimes
of moral turpitude can be used to impeach," he told a startled Judge Illston.

After a heated exchange between prosecutor Massullo and Serra, the judge
told Massullo, "I don't see the relevance of this and I'm not going to
allow it."

It turns out the warrant was for a traffic ticket for speeding -- five
miles an hour over the limit -- and that Baird had paid the fine with a
check, which Mendocino County had duly cashed. But the check was signed
Chohni Baird and the ticket was issued to Connie Kellerman. On this basis,
a Mendo judge had signed, at the DEA's insistence no doubt, a bench warrant
for Ms. Baird's arrest. (We are trying to find out which Mendo judge
signed onto this low scheme to undermine Ms. Baird's testimony.)

Outside the courtroom a uniformed San Francisco police officer was waiting
to arrest Ms. Baird on the bogus warrant. But the cop was conveniently
lured to the other end of the hall by an unusually attractive woman and
Baird slipped out of the courtroom and down the stairwell to freedom. The
cop, Cupid's arrow still stuck in his back, went huffing and puffing in
pursuit of the fleet Ms. Baird, but found the stairwell door mysteriously
jammed. Downstairs in the parking lot scores of DEA and uniformed SF
police, frantically yelling into their walkie talkies, also searched for
Ms. Baird, a bogus traffic ticket authenticated by a Mendocino County
judge, magically converted to a federal all points bulletin for a woman who
had committed no crime. But Ms. Baird made her escape, and was last
reported on a plane for Alaska - or was it Scotland?

It was finally time for the government's last witness. Like Ms. Cusick,
the feds got their money's worth. Sheriff's deputy Dennis Miller, formally
of Mendocino County and now working as a deputy in Eldorado County,
testified to a call he received from Victoria Horstman for an assault with
a deadly weapon. Miller testified he had been called to the house next
door to Dalton's in Redwood Valley, where he found Horstman doubled up,
crying that her husband John had hit her in the stomach with a baseball
bat. Miller called an ambulance for Horstman and went next door to knock
on Dalton's door. John Dalton answered holding a bloody wash cloth to his
face. Miller testified Dalton had a large bump on his head, a cut over his
left eye, and a bloody nose.

Dalton told Miller he had come home to find his wife drunk and blaming him
for his son's arrest earlier that day. Dalton retreated to his bedroom to
escape his rampaging mate, but she followed him into their DEA-bugged
bower, and when he turned around she hit him on the head with the bat.

Miller testified Dalton refused to press charges because he said "she's on
probation for DUI."

Miller further testified Dalton's injuries did not appear to be serious.
Miller stuck by this assessment even after shown pictures of Dalton's
wounds, which obviously warranted at a minimum a trip to the emergency room
for examination. Miller testified that he "was highly suspicious of
(Dalton's) validity. I thought he was lying."

Miller then went to the hospital where he examined Horstman for signs of
injuries. Nether he nor the emergency room physician could find any marks
on Horstman.

In spite of Dalton's head wound, and the complete absence of signs of
injury to Horstman, Miller, at times testifying as confidently about
Dalton's wound as if he were an MD, said it was his considered opinion that
Horstman was the victim and Dalton had assaulted her.

But Miller made no arrests.

Judge Susan Illston had absorbed this startling testimony for two days and
has since had the matter under submission. She will soon decide if the
government's outrageous conduct rises to the level of legally qualified
outrageous conduct. If she decides that it does, and if it doesn't one can
only wonder what does constitute outrageous government conduct, she will
dismiss all charges against John Dalton. If the judge decides the
government conduct was not sufficiently outrageous in their pursuit of John
Dalton, trial is set for August of this year.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Terence McKenna ~ Condition Report (A list subscriber forwards news that the
psychedelic philosopher has been diagnosed with brain cancer in Hawaii and is
not expected to live long.)

Date: Fri, 28 May 1999 02:14:22 EDT
Originator: friends@freecannabis.org
Sender: friends@freecannabis.org
From: Remembers@webtv.net (Genie Brittingham)
To: Multiple recipients of list (friends@freecannabis.org)
Subject: Terence McKenna ~ Condition Report

This is a report from Terence's brother, Dennis.

From: DJMcKenna@aol.com
Sent: Wednesday, May 26, 1999 8:06 PM
Subject: This is a second resend of the latest Terence update

To all,

This is the second (or third, I forget) update on Terence's situation. Most
of you already know that he is in the Queen's Medical Center in Honolulu,
having been diagnosed with brain cancer. If I missed including you in this
"update list" please forgive the omission; the older version of AOL was
giving me a lot of trouble trying to put together a list, and you may have
been missed in my attempts to work around that (count on AOL *not* to work
when you really need it). I've now installed a newer version which seems to
me much better.

Also, feel free to forward this to anyone you feel would want to know that is
not on this list but would like to be.

Here's the current situation; it is now Wednesday, 5/26, about 9 am here
in Honolulu. Terence, who has been here since Saturday after being flown here
from Kona after suffering several massive seizures, underwent the preliminary
biopsy procedure yesterday to collect a sample of the tumor so they can
determine what type it is and try to fill in the picture as to various
treatment options.

They will get the tissues back later today, and then will know more about the
cancer as such, what type it is, etc. But they already know enough from the
CAT scans and other data to present a fairly grim picture. Here's the bare
bones:

The tumor is lodged so deeply in the brain, and is located in such a place,
that surgical removal is probably not an option. There is a significant
chance he would not survive it, or survive it but remain in a coma with
severely impaired functions, or (the most optimistic scenario) survive with
impaired functions that could be recovered partially through rehabilitation.

The problem is that he would probably not survive long enough to complete
rehabilitation.

So the current options are as follows:

Instead of surgery, the doctor (Dr. Keep) is suggesting the gamma knife, a
focused gamma beam that will destroy the tumor. It is a noninvasive procedure
that is a one-day procedure; so it is like surgery but using gamma particles
instead of a knife.

That will kill the primary tumor (and he is now satisfied it is a primary
brain tumor, not a metastatic tumor from some other part of the body). There
is no sign of cancer elsewhere in Terence's body. The tumor may then resorb,
or it may swell, putting pressure on the brain which may necessitate surgery
later on anyway. And that surgery will be much more dangerous because he will
still be recovering from the gamma surgery.

The gamma procedure also should (in the doctor's view) be followed up by
x-ray radiotherapy to destroy cancer cells in the surrounding tissue. This
is a more diffuse, less focused procedure than the gamma knife, and requires
treatement 5 days a week for about six weeks. That will buy more time, but
the drawback is that Terenece would feel fine for a while, (although the
usual effects of radiation therapy; hair loss, severe fatigue, immune
compromise, etc.) but then in about a year would suffer what's called
radiation dementia, involving severe memory loss, loss of cognitive
functions, etc. This radiation dementia is not a maybe, it is a certainty.

The further bad news is that the doctor doesn't think he will survive long
enough to experience radiation dementia.

None of these procedures is a cure. The doctor is very clear on this point.
The procedures, and the various options, are to buy Terence some time,
preserve quality of life as much as possible as long as possible, but right
now, short of an outright miracle, survival beyond about two years maximum is
extremely unlikely.

Here is the projected survival rates for various options:

1. Do nothing, prevent seizures, keep the swelling down and keep him
comfortable: death in 1 month to two months maximum

2. Proceed with the gamma knife operation, kill the primary tumor, and do not
follow up with X-ray therapy. Survival to about six months, during which time
he will feel relatively good, and will not have dementia until the later,
terminal stages

3. Proceed with the recommended procedure, gamma knife + X-ray therapy. He
may have up to nine pretty good months, then a rapid decline.

Survival beyond a year is unlikely. Although survival up to two years is
known, but rare. But usually the final stages are not good for the patient in
terms of quality of life.

Another option may exist in that there may be experimental therapies, and
experimental treatment protocols, that would offer an alternative solution.
We are looking into this very vigorously as you can imagine. There is a lot
of active work in this area, but the question of qualifying to be included in
the treatment protocol, the time to get in, etc. will all have to be sorted
out. At this stage, we have not yet identified what experimental therapies
may be appropriate. The doctor has given us some excellent leads and we
welcome additional leads from one and all; rest assured, we're on it and any
thing we turn up that looks promising will be included in the next update.

Terence needs your hopes, prayers, and good vibes, as much as you can send,
however you think appropriate, more than ever now. You can use my email
address as a contact (djmckenna@aol.com) but please be understanding if I do
not respond to each email individually.

I have set up this email list to keep people informed, and if you want to be
included on the list (or excluded if your name is on this one and should not
be) just ask.

Also, unless you are a close personal friend of Terence's or a family member,
please do not, repeat do not, call the Queen's medical center in Honolulu.

Thanks for your help, love, and support, and stay tuned.

Dennis
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Decriminalizing Research (A staff editorial in the Blade, in Toledo, Ohio,
says the federal government's decision to soften its stance on research into
the medical use of marijuana is overdue, but in part a response to voter
sentiment.)

Date: Sat, 29 May 1999 17:40:46 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US OH: Editorial: Decriminalizing Research
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Richard Lake
Pubdate: Wed, 26 May 1999
Source: Blade, The (OH)
Copyright: 1999 The Blade.
Contact: letters@theblade.com
Address: 541 North Superior St., Toledo, OH 43660
Website: http://www.toledoblade.com/

DECRIMINALIZING RESEARCH

The federal government's decision to soften its stance on research into the
medical use of marijuana is overdue. For too long the demonization of the
drug, even to the extent of limiting scientific research, has delayed
important studies of whether marijuana may ease the pain and symptoms
associated with such ailments as cancer, AIDS, and glaucoma.

This is not opening the door to the widespread cultivation of marijuana and
the accompanying risk of lax controls allowing supplies to reach to street.
Rather it will allow a government approved growing site at the University
of Mississippi to increase its crop to provide sufficient marijuana for
researchers.

It has long been to the nation's shame that research has been limited into
the possible palliative effects of the drug for some patients. That is
particularly the case when some of those suffering from AIDS or glaucoma,
for example, are forced to the illegal market for their supply. In their
search for help in managing their ailments, these people have been
transformed into criminals. That's unacceptable.

The federal government is in part responding to voter sentiment supportive
of such research. Medical use of marijuana already has been approved in at
least six states, but because the drug is banned by federal law, some
doctors have been understandably nervous about prescribing it. The new
guidelines may ease those fears.

Those guidelines will allow privately funded researchers to purchase pot
from the government for use in studies sanctioned by the National
Institutes of Health. Both an NIH panel and the National Academy of
Sciences' Institute of Medicine have urged further scientific research into
possible medical benefits of marijuana for some patients.

Such research could lead to relief of the suffering of thousands of
Americans. Seen from that perspective it is, as we have said, difficult to
justify the time it has taken to reach this point. Allowing medical
research was never going to initiate "reefer madness.'' Instead, the
government's hard-nosed approach was seen as cruelly insensitive to the
needs of those patients who might be helped by using the drug.

Encouraging research cannot by any stretch of the imagination be viewed as
an endorsement of the drugs' recreational use. Rather, it is recognition
that marijuana may have medical benefits - and if so, they should be
uncovered and made available to patients in need.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Michigan Girl Due Big Apology Over Mistaken Marijuana (The Associated Press
says the weed discovered in the locker of a 14-year-old girl in Eastpointe
turned out to be dried carnation leaves left over from a school celebration.)

Date: Fri, 28 May 1999 18:55:16 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US MI: Wire: Michigan Girl Due Big Apology Over Mistaken
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: chuck beyer
Pubdate: Wed, 26 May 1999
Source: Associated Press
Copyright: 1999 Associated Press

MICHIGAN GIRL DUE BIG APOLOGY OVER MISTAKEN MARIJUANA

EASTPOINTE, Michigan (AP) -- A Michigan girl is getting a big apology after
the dried-up leaves in her school locker turned out to be carnation leaves
-- not pot.

The 14-year-old had been accused of keeping marijuana in her school locker.
The accusation come after a locker search last week at the girl's school.

The superintendent of East Detroit Public Schools says an investigation
shows the leaves were just leaves -- he calls it all a mistake. The girl
and her mother will get an apology from school officials.

The girl says she has nothing to do with drugs and was upset by the
accusation. Her mother says the carnation leaves were left in her
daughter's locker from a school celebration.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

State hearings on expanding the medical use of marijuana (A news release from
the Massachusetts Cannabis Reform Coalition, a NORML affiliate, says the
legislature's Joint Committee on Health Care will hold a public hearing
tomorrow on widening the range of medical conditions for which the Department
of Public Health may approve the experimental use of marijuana. Until last
Friday, when NIDA announced that it will start to sell research-grade
marijuana to any bona fide researcher, not just those funded by NIH, there
was no marijuana available to the state's program.)

From: Epeggs@aol.com
From: "CRRH mailing list" (restore@crrh.org)
Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 23:41:06 EDT
Subject: State hearings on expanding the medical use of marijuana
To: undisclosed-recipients:;

Massachusetts Cannabis Reform Coalition\NORML

A State Affiliate
of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws

P.O. Box 0266
Georgetown, MA 01833-0366
781-944-2266
http://www.masscann.org
epeggs@aol.com

"We shall by and by want a world of hemp more for our own consumption."
John Adams, as Humphrey Ploughjogger, 1763

***

State hearings on expanding the medical use of marijuana

For immediate release

For more information contact:
Steven Epstein, Esq. 1-978-685-9696 or, epeggs@aol.com

Georgetown, MA - On Thursday, May 27, the Joint Committee on Health Care will
hold a public hearing on widening the range of medical conditions for which
the Department of Public Health may approve the experimental use of marijuana.

Currently the Department has the authority to authorize experimentation in
the use of marijuana to alleviate the nausea and ill-effect of cancer
chemotherapy and radiation therapy, decrease intraocular pressure in glaucoma
patients and to decrease airway resistance in asthmatics. Participation is
limited to patients certified to be threatened by loss of life or sight, or
asthmatics who experience severe respiratory problems or discomfort; not
responding to or has incurred severe side effects from the administration of
conventional controlled substances; and the patient's written informed
consent as to the nature, duration, and purpose of the research, the method
and means by which it is to be conducted, the inconveniences and hazards
reasonably to be expected, and the effects upon the patient's health or
person which may reasonably be expected to come from his participation.

Several published studies and a growing body of anecdotal evidence
indicates that marijuana is useful not only for those illnesses that fit the
current law but for controlling muscle spasms in patients suffering from
multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, spinal cord injury, paraplegia and
quadriplegia. Tens of thousands of cancer and AIDS patients already use
medical marijuana, although most risk arrest and jail if discovered. They
report it is effective in reducing the nausea and vomiting associated with
their treatment, and helps stimulate the appetite of individuals suffering
from the AIDS wasting syndrome.

Until last Friday, when the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
announced that it will start to sell research-grade marijuana to any bona
fide researcher, not just those funded by the National Institutes of Health
(NIH), there was no marijuana available to the State's program.

According to a number of recent public opinion polls, the American
public strongly supports the medical use of marijuana. Mass Cann hopes the
committee, the entire legislature, and the Governor understand that the
medical use of marijuana is a public health issue; it is not part of the war
on drugs.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Four Guards Charged In Inmate Death (The Associated Press says four prison
guards in Uniondale, New York, were indicted Wednesday in the beating death
of Thomas Pizzuto, an inmate who allegedly angered them by repeatedly crying
out for his methadone prescription. Pizzuto, a recovering heroin addict, had
a seizure three days after the alleged beating and died six days after
entering the Nassau County jail to serve three months for a traffic
violation.)

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 23:47:48 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US NY: Wire: Four Guards Charged In Inmate Death
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: EWCHIEF
Pubdate: Wed, 26 May 1999
Source: Associated Press
Copyright: 1999 Associated Press
Author: PAT MILTON Associated Press Writer

FOUR GUARDS CHARGED IN INMATE DEATH

UNIONDALE, N.Y. (AP) Four prison guards were charged Wednesday in the
beating death of an inmate who allegedly angered them by repeatedly crying
out for his methadone treatment.

The guards pleaded innocent in the death of Thomas Pizzuto, who died six
days after entering the Nassau County jail to serve three months for a
traffic violation.

Pizzuto, 38, a recovering heroin addict, had a seizure three days after the
alleged beating and died.

"A 90-day sentence turned into a death sentence," Pizzuto family attorney
Peter Neufeld said.

All four guards were released on $500,000 bond. Lawyers for the men said
they would be cleared.

"He feels he will be vindicated," said defense lawyer Edward Jenks,
representing Officer Ivano Bavaro.

Bavaro, along with fellow jail guards Edward Valazquez and Patrick Regnier,
were charged with two counts of federal civil rights violations. The charges
carry a maximum sentence of life in prison.

According to the indictment, Bavaro served as lookout when Valazquez and
Regnier went to the inmate's cell and beat him repeatedly on Pizzuto's
second day in custody.

After the alleged Jan. 8 beating, Pizzuto was left in his jail cell over the
weekend to let his injuries heal, his family claimed.

A fourth guard, Joseph Bergen, was charged as an accessory after the fact
for allegedly doctoring a report of the death to claim Pizzuto suffered his
injuries in a shower room fall. The maximum sentence for the charge is 15
years in prison.

All four officers remain on modified duty at the jail pending trial. Their
weapons were taken away, and they are permitted no contact with inmates.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Cannabis Conspiracy: The Film Your Government Doesn't Want You To See (A list
subscriber posts the URL where the New York Lower East Side Film Festival's
best Documentary Feature can be viewed using Real Player.)

From: HEMPTV@aol.com
From: "CRRH mailing list" (restore@crrh.org)
Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 16:56:34 EDT
Subject: Cannabis Conspiracy
To: restore@crrh.org

I am happy to announce that Cannabis Conspiracy The Film Your Government
Doesn't Want You To See, won best Documentary Feature in The New York Lower
East Side Film Festival.

A sign of many more good things to come!

Peace

Kenya

You can watch the video using the Real Player at:

http://www.crrh.org/hemptv/misc_cancon.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------

The Action Class for Therapeutic Cannabis is now reopened and again accepting
plaintiffs (A news release from the camp of Philadelphia public-interest
attorney Lawrence Elliott Hirsch says Judge Katz on May 17 ordered a
three-month delay in the federal civil lawsuit proceedings. During the last
two months, the number of plaintiffs in Kuromiya v. United States has
doubled, from 165 to 320, and more are invited to participate in seeking to
overturn the federal ban on medical marijuana.)

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 21:40:53 -0500
From: Arthur Sobey (asobey@ncfcomm.com)
Reply-To: asobey@ncfcomm.com
To: cp@telelists.com
Subject: [cp] The Action Class for Therapeutic Cannabis is now reopened and
again accepting plaintiffs.

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA

____________________________________________
)
KIYOSHI KUROMIYA, et al., )
Plaintiffs, )
)
v. ) CIVIL ACTION NO. 98-3439
)
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, )
Defendant )
____________________________________________)

CLASS ACTION LAWSUIT POSTPONEMENT

Judge Katz signed the order for a postponement on May 17 and is allowing
a three month extension. Trial data is not set, but will probably
commence in mid October.

During the last two months, the action class has doubled in size, from
165 to 320 plaintiffs.

We invite yet further participation. The Action Class for Therapeutic
Cannabis is now reopened and again accepting plaintiffs.

***

Arthur Sobey
Media Communications Director
The Class Action For Therapeutic Cannabis
asobey@actionclass.org
402-379-5732

Contributions in support of medical freedom can be made
to the Class Action For Therapeutic Cannabis at:

Lifeservices
Post Office Box 4314
Boca Raton, Florida 33429
561-750-0554
joan@actionclass.org
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Jenkintown Survey Finds Drug Abuse High Among Youth (The Philadelphia
Inquirer says a survey of 285 Jenkintown students in February by the
Atlanta-based drug-warrior group, the National Parents' Resource for Drug
Education, or PRIDE, found alcohol was the drug of choice for the majority of
students in grades six through 12. However, 61 percent of 10th graders said
they used marijuana, almost twice the national average of 33 percent. Among
high school seniors, 55 percent said they smoked marijuana, compared with a
national average of 38 percent. School officials said a DARE program and
several antidrug student groups were helping, though 75 of the 285 students
reported they had been in trouble with police.)

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 16:45:58 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US PA: Jenkintown Survey Finds Drug Abuse High Among Youth
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Mike Gogulski
Pubdate: Wed, 26 May 1999
Source: Philadelphia Inquirer (PA)
Copyright: 1999 Philadelphia Newspapers Inc.
Contact: Inquirer.Opinion@phillynews.com
Website: http://www.phillynews.com/
Forum: http://interactive.phillynews.com/talk-show/
Author: Kate Campbell

JENKINTOWN SURVEY FINDS DRUG ABUSE HIGH AMONG YOUTH ALCOHOL

Alcohol and marijuana use topped U.S. average, according to students.

JENKINTOWN -- School district officials have released the results of a drug
survey that showed alcohol to be the drug of choice for the majority of
students in grades six through 12.

Alcohol use exceeded the national average among Jenkintown's eighth through
12th graders, district officials said at a meeting Monday.

The PRIDE survey, conducted by the Atlanta-based National Parents' Resource
for Drug Education, was administered to 285 Jenkintown students in February.

This was the fourth year students in Jenkintown participated in the survey.
The tiny district, which has only two schools, had a total enrollment of 610
this year. In addition to which drugs were used, the report also included
statistics on when they were used, their accessibility, and students'
perception of the danger of drugs.

"Fifty-five percent of eighth graders thought it was very easy to get beer,"
said Judy Meier, Jenkintown High School guidance counselor. Equally
troubling, Meier said, was a dramatic jump in drug and alcohol use between
the seventh and eighth grades.

"As students get older, they don't worry as much" about the harmful effects
of substance abuse, she said of the survey's findings. "There is use, and it
does exist here."

Sixty-one percent of 10th graders said they used marijuana, the survey
found, almost twice the national average of 33 percent. Among high school
seniors, 55 percent said they smoked marijuana, compared with a national
average of 38 percent, Meier said. Because some students exaggerated in the
anonymous survey, administrators said, a margin of error should be expected.

Although the survey indicated that drug use in Jenkintown occurs mostly on
weekends and less frequently at school, the small group of parents in
attendance at Monday's meeting were concerned. The bulk of the
responsibility for addressing drug and alcohol awareness, one mother said,
was with the parents.

"The teachers are doing everything they can," said parent Gigi Burns, who
added that she had tried to get district administrators to focus on a local
drug and alcohol problem.

"I'm upset with the community's refusal to step forward and recognize the
problem," Burns said. She said she would continue to generate community
discussion on what she called a growing problem here.

A police-run Drug Abuse Resistance Education program and several antidrug
student groups in the district were helping, school officials said. Still,
75 of the 285 students polled reported that they had been in trouble with
police, Meier said.

Calls placed to the district's superintendent and the principals of the
elementary and high schools were not returned yesterday.

The numbers of children using drugs and alcohol in the district surprised
Jenkintown Police Chief Craig Rickard, who spoke at the meeting.

"I'm stunned, frankly," Rickard said. "I can see where my work is here."
-------------------------------------------------------------------

High Times Magazine Releases Its First Comprehensive Report On Marijuana in
the U.S. (A company press release on Business Wire says the July issue, due
out June 1, will feature the magazine's first comprehensive U.S. marijuana
report, "Marijuana By The Numbers." Based on the U.S. government's own
numbers and independent research by High Times, the report concludes, among
other things, that marijuana prohibition costs taxpayers $27 billion a year,
almost twice the social costs of marijuana use. More than one-third of adult
Americans have smoked marijuana, including at least 11 million in the past
month.)

Date: Thu, 27 May 1999 11:18:25 -0700 (PDT)
From: Den de (dendecannabist@yahoo.com)
Subject: HT: High Times Magazine Releases Its First
Comprehensive Report On Marijuana in the US
To: Hemp Talk *cannabist (hemp-talk@hemp.net)
Sender: owner-hemp-talk@hemp.net

High Times Magazine Releases Its First Comprehensive
Report On Marijuana in the US

Updated 1:29 PM ET May 26, 1999

NEW YORK (BUSINESS WIRE) - One third of all adults in this country have tried
marijuana at least once. So why don't more people know the facts? On June 1st
(in the July issue of High Times), the magazine the DEA turns to for
information on marijuana will release its first comprehensive U.S. marijuana
report, "Marijuana By The Numbers."

How many Americans smoke pot? How many of them are being arrested? How much
does the War on Drugs cost us? Is today's pot really stronger than what was
smoked in the '60's? The answers are finally available.

Among the findings:

* More than one-third of adult Americans have smoked marijuana, with
at least 11 million getting high at least once a month.

* Marijuana is one of the top five cash crops in America, with California,
Tennessee and Kentucky the leading producers.

* Today's marijuana is not significantly more potent than what was sold in
the '70s, but top-quality sinsemilla is much easier to find.

* Marijuana arrests exceeded 700,000 this past year and, if the projected
trend continues, they will top 1 million in 2001.

* Pot-smokers are most likely to be arrested in the Northeast (New York,
Washington, DC, and New Jersey) and in the Deep South.

* Marijuana prohibition costs taxpayers $27 billion a year, almost twice the
social costs of marijuana use. The costs of enforcing marijuana laws and the
income lost by people jailed for marijuana have doubled since 1992, and far
exceed the costs of drug education and treatment and counseling for marijuana
users.

"We're very proud of this report. It is the premiere place one can go for
critical information on marijuana in the U.S," commented High Times'
publisher, Mike Edison. "This is an objective, scientific report, and it
reinforces High Times' place as the number one authority on the subject."

The complete report, based on the U.S. government's own numbers and
independent research by High Times, is in the July issue of High Times, on
sale June 1st.

High Times, the Most Notorious Magazine in the World, celebrates its 25th
anniversary this year.

***

Peace not WoD!
Cannabis:Food, Fuel, Fiber, FARMaceuticals!
http://homepages.go.com/homepages/m/a/r/marthag1/ddc.htm

***

hemp-talk - hemp-talk@hemp.net is a discussion/information
list about hemp politics in Washington State. To unsubscribe, send
e-mail to majordomo@hemp.net with the text "unsubscribe hemp-talk".
For more details see http://www.hemp.net/lists.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Police Probing Drug Claims (According to the Calgary Herald, Calgary police
say they are investigating Grant Krieger, who was featured in a Herald
article Tuesday claiming he intends to distribute marijuana for medicinal
purposes through the Universal Compassion Club.)

Date: Fri, 28 May 1999 01:04:38 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: Canada: Police Probing Drug Claims
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: daystar1@home.com
Pubdate: Wed. 26, May 1999
Source: Calgary Herald (Canada)
Contact: letters@theherald.southam.ca
Website: http://www.calgaryherald.com/
Author: Jeff Adams, Calgary Herald

POLICE PROBING DRUG CLAIMS

Calgary police say they are investigating a man featured in a Herald
article Tuesday who claimed he intends to distribute marijuana for
medicinal purposes.

`We will investigate his activities just as we would investigate
anyone else about whom we receive information about trafficking,' said
Staff Sgt. Paul Laventure of the drug unit, after the story about
Calgarian Grant Krieger.

`If Mr. Krieger is in fact trafficking in marijuana, he will be be
charged.'

Krieger is serving an 18-month suspended sentence for trafficking
after a late-1998 conviction.

The 44-year-old man says he smokes marijuana to help him cope with
multiple sclerosis (MS), and opposes laws stopping Canadians from
using marijuana as a medical aid.

In Tuesday's Herald, Krieger is shown handing a bag - allegedly
containing marijuana - to a Turner Valley-area women who says the drug
has helped her achieve a miraculous recovery from fibromyalgia.

Krieger told the Herald he's established a so-called Universal
Compassion Club for people wanting marijuana for medical purposes, and
is recruiting drug suppliers for the club.

He said he plans to be a supplier too.

Because some of Krieger's club members could be from outside Calgary,
RCMP say they may also investigate.

`I don't want to get in a debate with him about the medicinal uses of
marijuana,' said Staff Sgt. Bernie Smith of the Calgary RCMP's drug
section.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

MPs Back Move Toward Legalized Medicinal Pot (The Montreal Gazette says the
Canadian House of Commons voted last night to urge the federal government to
"take steps" toward legalizing marijuana for medical use. Members of the
governing Liberal Party united with opposition MPs to approve, 204-29, a
diluted version of a Bloc Quebecois motion calling for legalization of the
herb so those ill with cancer, AIDS and epilepsy can ease their suffering
without fear of prosecution.)

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 08:07:00 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: Canada: MPs Back Move Toward Legalized Medicinal Pot
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: creator@mapinc.org
Pubdate: Wed, 26 May 1999
Source: Montreal Gazette (Canada)
Copyright: 1999 The Gazette, a division of Southam Inc.
Contact: letters@thegazette.southam.ca
Website: http://www.montrealgazette.com/
Forum: http://forums.canada.com/~montreal
Author: David Gamble

MPS BACK MOVE TOWARD LEGALIZED MEDICINAL POT

The House of Commons voted last night to urge the federal government to
"take steps" toward legalizing marijuana for medical use.

Governing Liberals united with opposition MPs to approve, by a 204-29 vote,
a diluted version of a Bloc Quebecois motion calling for legalization of the
street drug so those ill with cancer, AIDS and epilepsy can ease their
suffering without fear of prosecution.

The reworded motion reflects Health Minister Allan Rock's commitment in
March to begin clinical trials of medical marijuana, but like Rock it makes
no commitment as to whether the drug will be made available to patients as
treatment rather than research.

Rock has promised to unveil his "research plan" next month. His spokesman,
Derek Kent, played down the importance of last night's vote: "That timetable
remains the same."

But Bloc MP Bernard Bigras defended the Commons' vote as necessary, arguing
that little has happened since Rock's initial announcement and the sick who
use marijuana are still being harassed by police.

Bigras urged Rock to use his power to exempt individuals from Criminal Code
prosecution on compassionate grounds, noting that the Commons has now joined
the Ontario Superior Court, which this month gave Toronto AIDS activist Jim
Wakeford the legal right to grow and use marijuana. Rock has said the
federal government won't appeal that court ruling.

After the vote, Bigras said the Bloc "will now ensure that the government
keeps its word on this question."

"We still don't have the research protocol," he said. The Bloc voted against
the Liberal amendments, but turned around and supported the watered-down
version, arguing that it still sends a message to the government.

"I'm sure I'll have ill people coming to see me in the coming days, saying
that these clinical trials won't give them access to marijuana for three
years, so what we're saying is we favour clinical tests but we need
immediate access to marijuana," Bigras said.

Wakeford won the right to grow and smoke marijuana for his own use under a
constitutional exemption from prosecution granted by an Ontario Superior
Court judge, who criticized Ottawa for foot-dragging in handling exemption
applications from dying patients.

He is only the second Canadian to use the drug with legal immunity. Terry
Parker of Toronto, who has epilepsy, won the right in November 1997, but the
Crown has appealed that ruling.

In the United States, some states allow pot use by the terminally ill,
despite some warnings from experts that it may not be the wonder drug
advocates say it is. The medical establishment has noted that, as a
painkiller, marijuana is not that potent and it has side-effects like
confusion and sedation.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Medicinal marijuana wins conditional OK (The Canadian Press version in the
Calgary Sun)

From: creator@islandnet.com (Matt Elrod)
To: mattalk@listserv.islandnet.com
Subject: Canada: Medicinal marijuana wins conditional OK
Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 07:24:45 -0700
Lines: 29
Source: Calgary Sun (Canada)
Contact: callet@sunpub.com
Pubdate: Wednesday, May 26, 1999

Medicinal marijuana wins conditional OK

By CP

OTTAWA -- The federal government has moved one step closer to permitting
the use of marijuana for medical purposes.

A Bloc Quebecois motion calling for the legalization of pot for medical
reasons passed last night in the House of Commons, with a few amendments.

The motion calls on the government to "take steps immediately" to develop
clinical trials, guidelines for its use and a safe supply of marijuana for
people who need it for medical reasons. Earlier this spring, Health Minister
Allan Rock promised clinical trials into the medicinal use of marijuana.

Following the vote, Rock said he will publicize the government's plan for
legalizing medical pot, likely before the House breaks for the summer.

Ontario social activist Jim Wakeford won the legal right to grow and smoke
marijuana earlier this month by receiving an interim constitutional exemption
from prosecution.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Pot Legislation Supported (A lengthier Canadian Press version)

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 16:02:53 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: Canada: Wire: Pot Legislation Supported
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Chris Clay (http://www.thecompassionclub.org/)
Pubdate: May 26, 1999
Source: Canadian Press (Canada)
Copyright: 1999 The Canadian Press (CP).

POT LEGISLATION SUPPORTED

OTTAWA - The federal government has moved one step closer to
permitting the use of marijuana for medical purposes.

A Bloc Quebecois motion calling for the legalization of pot for
medical reasons passed Tuesday night in the House of Commons, with a
few amendments.

The motion calls on the government to"take steps immediately" to
develop clinical trials, guidelines for its use and a safe supply of
marijuana for people who need it for medical reasons.

Earlier this spring, Health Minister Allan Rock promised clinical
trials into the medicinal use of marijuana.

Following the vote, Rock said he will publicize the government's plan
for legalizing medical pot, likely before the House breaks for the
summer.

Some are predicting that will happen June 9.

"I've asked (government researchers) before the House rises in June to
give me a plan: how is one going to qualify for inclusion in the
clinical trials, how many people will be involved, how will we make
the marijuana available -- all the details of how the research is
going to be conducted."

Within that time, Rock added, he will also release the government's
decisions on some of the applications by Canadians who have sought
permission to use the drug for medical reasons.

That includes Jim Wakeford, an Ontario social activist who has
AIDS.

Wakeford won the legal right to grow and smoke marijuana earlier this
month by receiving an interim constitutional exemption from
prosecution.

Ontario Superior Court Judge Harry LaForme issued the order while the
federal government decides on Wakeford's application for an exemption
from prosecution.

He was just the second Canadian allowed to use the drug with legal
impunity.

Toronto epileptic Terry Parker was the first.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Commons Backs Pot Law (A brief Toronto Star version)

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 16:00:43 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: Canada: Commons Backs Pot Law
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Dave Haans
Pubdate: Wednesday, May 26, 1999
Source: Toronto Star (Canada)
Copyright: 1999, The Toronto Star
Contact: lettertoed@thestar.com
Website: http://www.thestar.com/
Page: A6

COMMONS BACKS POT LAW

The federal government is nearer permitting the use of marijuana for
medical purposes. A Bloq motion urging the
legalization of pot for medical reasons passed last night, with a few
amendments. The motion calls on the government to "take steps
immediately" to develop clinical trials, guidelines for use and a safe
supply of marijuana for people who need it for medical reasons.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Australia More Open Than United States (A letter to the editor of the Sydney
Morning Herald, in Australia, from a woman who has just returned after living
in the United States for the past year, applauds the open discussion prompted
by the recent New South Wales drug summit. In America, "the drug issue was
never raised, either in the media or in general conversation." Americans
"tend to 'cover up' rather than try to heal the problem.")

Date: Sat, 29 May 1999 10:43:44 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: Australia: PUB LTE: Australia More Open Than United States
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Ken Russell
Pubdate: Wed, 26 May 1999
Source: Sydney Morning Herald (Australia)
Contact: letters@smh.fairfax.com.au
Website: http://www.smh.com.au/
Author: Janice Creenaune
Note: Title supplied by newshawk

AUSTRALIA MORE OPEN THAN UNITED STATES

Even more pleasing than the surprising events that have arisen from
the recent Drug Summit is the very fact that there are so many
newspaper articles, letters to the editor and open discussion on the
drug issue.

After living in the United States for the past year - where the drug
issue was never raised, either in the media or in general conversation
- it is so pleasing to return home to so many forth-right opinions
even if, at this stage, there is little agreement.

In the US they are aware of their drug problems but tend to "cover up"
rather than try to heal the problem. Here, in this country, we are at
least attempting to find solutions.

It is a great start.

Janice Creenaune,
Austinmer,
May 24.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

What If Cigarettes Were Illegal? (Another letter to the editor of the Sydney
Morning World wonders to what levels people would stoop and what would happen
to the price of a cigarette on the black market, if we threw offenders into
jail, ostracised users and their families, and limited the supply of
quit-smoking programs and technology.)

Date: Sat, 29 May 1999 11:44:49 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: Australia: PUB LTE: What If Cigarettes Were Illegal?
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Ken Russell
Pubdate: Wed, 26 May 1999
Source: Sydney Morning Herald (Australia)
Contact: letters@smh.fairfax.com.au
Website: http://www.smh.com.au/
Source: Sydney Morning Herald (Australia)
Author: Paul Gittings
Note: Title supplied by newshawk

WHAT IF CIGARETTES WERE ILLEGAL?

Re Dr Ashley Berry's letter (Herald, May 24), the good doctor is right
that it is probably the case that no cigarette smoker has "pimped,
bashed or stolen for a packet of fags".

However, if we were to make cigarettes illegal tomorrow, throw
offenders into jail, ostracise the users and their families, limit the
supply of quit smoking programs, limit the supply and availability of
nicotine patches, gums, etc, what would happen to the price of a
cigarette on the black market? To what levels would people stoop to
get their next drag?

Of course, such a scenario would never occur. We are a just and caring
society. We would look after people with such addiction. We wouldn't
ostracise them or their families; we would spend heaps on quit smoking
campaigns; we would, to a certain extent, tolerate their addiction and
would never consider it a criminal problem but a health one.

Why the difference in society attitudes against two substances, both
of which are addictive drugs and both of which kill?

Beats me. I'll have a drink and ponder on it.

Paul Gittings,
Russell Lea
May 25
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Under-25s Targeted In Tough Plan To Break Cycle Of Drugs and Crime (The
Scotsman says the British Government yesterday announced ambitious targets to
halve the use of hard drugs among young people in England and Wales as part
of a tough 10-year plan. Announcing the plan in parliament, Jack Cunningham,
the Cabinet Office minister, said the focus was on heroin and cocaine misuse,
which is a big cause of crime. The RAC also seized the opportunity to appeal
to the Government to address the problem of motorists who drive under the
influence of drugs.)

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 16:05:58 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: UK: Under-25s Targeted In Tough Plan To Break Cycle Of Drugs
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: shug@shuggie.demon.co.uk
Pubdate: 26 May 1999
Source: Scotsman (UK)
Copyright: The Scotsman Publications Ltd 1999
Contact: Letters_ts@scotsman.com
Website: http://www.scotsman.com/
Forum: http://www.scotsman.com/
Author: Paul Peachey

UNDER-25S TARGETED IN TOUGH PLAN TO BREAK CYCLE OF DRUGS AND CRIME

Ambitious targets to halve the use of hard drugs among young people in
England and Wales were announced by the Government yesterday as part
of a tough 10-year plan.

Repeat offenders and the under-25s emerged as key targets to break the
cycle of crime and drug abuse as the first annual report by Keith
Hellawell, the drugs tsar, was published.

Announcing the plans in parliament, Jack Cunningham, the Cabinet
Office minister, said the plan focused on heroin and cocaine misuse,
which is a big cause of crime.

The RAC also seized the opportunity to appeal to the Government to
address the problem of motorists who drive under the influence of drugs.

It is estimated that three million people regularly take illegal drugs
in the United Kingdom, and a survey found that 85 per cent of the 22
to 25-year-olds believe that their peer group regularly drive after
taking drugs.

Government plans published yesterday suggest drug addicts should be
sent to rehabilitation clinics instead of jail in an effort to halve
the reoffending rate for drug addicts by 2008. It will depend on the
outcome of trials in Croydon, south London, Gloucester and Liverpool.
Dr Cunningham said: "If they show not to be an efficient use of
resources then we shall have to make changes."

Similar studies in the United States showed that offenders coerced on
to drug programmes fared no worse than people who went on them
voluntarily.

Paul Cavadino, the director of policy for the National Association for
the Care and Resettlement of Offenders (NACRO), said: "This is the
most significant package of measures to divert offenders from crime
announced in the last decade.

"Conventional punishments do nothing to stop offenders using drugs but
simply produce a vicious circle of crime, imprisonment and a rapid
return to drug use."

A heroin or crack cocaine addict can spend up to UKP20,000 a year on
drugs and accounted for 30 per cent of all crime. Dr Cunningham said
that cheaper, purer heroin was hitting the streets with children
experimenting from the age of 13.

Mr Hellawell announced that UKP3 million seized from drug traffickers
would be used to tackle the problem during 1999-2000 rising to
million in 2001-2.

Plans include cutting the use of heroin and cocaine by young people by
25 per cent by 2005 and 50 per cent by 2008 and the number of 11 to
16-year-olds using Class A drugs by 20 per cent by 2002. A further
36 million would be spent to identify the true scale of the drug
problem.

But the Conservatives cautioned against a let-up on other drug
controls. Tory MP Ann Winterton, said the country wanted "to see
effective deterrents of drug use and trafficking and they want to see
tough penalties". She added there should be "no soft message on drugs."

Dr Cunningham promised no let-up and criticised public figures who
glamorised drug-taking.

Speaking on the day that the former England rugby union captain
Lawrence Dallaglio admitted experimenting with drugs, Dr Cunningham
said: "We have had recently a whole series of high profile cases,
which are very, very damaging to the well being of the young people of
this country."

Meanwhile the RAC wants an awareness campaign to cut the number of
deaths on the roads involving drugs. Government statistics show 18 per
cent of such deaths were drug-drivers. This was three times the
number found in research conducted 10 years ago.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Ministers Pledge To Halve UK Drug Abuse (The version in Britain's
Independent)

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 16:45:55 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: UK: Ministers Pledge To Halve Uk Drug Abuse
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Martin Cooke (mjc1947@cyberclub.iol.ie)
Pubdate: Thurs, 26 May 1999
Source: Independent, The (UK)
Copyright: 1999 Independent Newspapers (UK) Ltd.
Contact: letters@independent.co.uk
Address: 1 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London E14 5DL
Website: http://www.independent.co.uk/
Author: Jason Bennetto Crime Correspondent

MINISTERS PLEDGE TO HALVE UK DRUG ABUSE

AN ambitious programme drastically to reduce heroin and cocaine abuse, stop
schoolchildren taking drugs, and wean addicts away from their criminal
lifestyles, was unveiled by the Government yesterday.

The strategy for the next decade concentrates on treating users at clinics
and rehabilitation centres rather than punishing them in jail.

Under the plans, the Government hopes to halve the reoffending rate for drug
addicts by 2008, and to achieve the same reduction in the number of young
people using heroin and cocaine. The number of children aged 11 to 16 using
class A drugs should be reduced by a fifth by 2002, and the number of
treatment places will be doubled to about 100,000 by 2008.

About UKP15m of assets seized from drug-dealers are to be ploughed back into
preventive work during the next three years, to fund the proposals.

Drugs agencies, however, were startled at the scale of the targets set by
the Government and questioned whether the proposals were feasible without
massive additional funding. The issue was further thrown into confusion when
it emerged at the launch of the national strategy that the Government had
not compiled statistics to measure its strategy against. It will therefore
be impossible to calculate whether the cuts promised have been successful.

The multi-stranded strategy targets heroin and crack cocaine abuse and the
rising level of drug-taking among teenagers. New research has identified
outbreaks of heroin use in smaller cities, towns and rural areas throughout
the United Kingdom. Crack cocaine and heroin users are responsible for a
vast amount of crime - with a typical addict's habit costing between
UKP10,000 and UKP20,000 a year.

Surveys have also found that children are experimenting with drugs at an
increasingly young age, with around a quarter of 14- and 15-year-olds having
taken illegal drugs.

Keith Hellawell, the Government's anti-drugs co-ordinator, published his
first national plan to tackle the problem yesterday, and it included a
proposal to double the number of drug abusers in treatment programmes by
2008. There are around 30,000 people currently being treated in the UK, but
an estimated 200,000 people have serious problems.Assets seized from
traffickers could be used as funding along with some of the extra UKP217m
the Government has pledged for anti-drugs initiatives.

By 2002, all schools should have special anti-drugs programmes, under the
proposals made yesterday. These will include "life-skill" teaching, and
education for parents. The strategy also aims to reduce within three years
the number of 11- to 16-year-olds who use class A drugs, such as heroin,
cocaine and ecstasy.

Jack Cunningham, Minister for the Cabinet Office, who helped launch the
plan, explained that the switch in focus to treatment programmes was to try
and prevent addicts from returning to a life of crime.

He said during 1999-2000 the number of people arrested and referred to drug
treatment programmes would be doubled.

Asked his opinion about the recent series of public figures who have been
accused of cocaine taking, Mr Cunningham said: "It's deplorable, it's giving
an abysmal, appalling example to young people. There's no glamour in
drug-taking. It wrecks lives, it wrecks health and ruins families."

The Government is particularly keen to reduce the level of repeat offending
by drug users. Mr Hellawell said new Home Office research showed that 30 per
cent of crimes were drug-linked, and the strategy aims to cut offending by a
half.

Last year more than five million crimes were reported to the police in
England and Wales, more than 100,000 of which were for drug offences. Mr
Hellawell admitted, however, as with all the targets, that there were not
any accurate figures to calculate how many people were responsible for
drug-related crimes. In an attempt to gain a more accurate impression of the
scale of the national drug problem, UKP6m is to be spent on research.

Roger Howard, chief executive of the Standing Conference on Drug Abuse, said
he was "concerned that drug services on the ground will find themselves
under substantial pressure to meet such ambitious objectives".

Paul Cavadino of the National Association for the Care and Resettlement of
Offenders, said: "This is the most significant package of measures to divert
offenders from crime announced in the last decade."
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Smugglers Are Still Ahead In Drugs War (The Times, in Britain, says that even
as the Government announced ambitious new goals designed to reduce hard drugs
abuse, Dr Jack Cunningham, the Cabinet enforcer who has responsibility for
co-ordinating drugs policy, admitted the war against drugs in Britain was
being lost, with more substances being smuggled into the country causing a
collapse in street prices and threatening a new heroin epidemic. His warning
came after a grim assessment of the 1.4 billion drugs war by Customs and
Excise concluded there was increased demand in the country, leading to more
substances coming in.)

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 17:08:24 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: UK: Smugglers Are Still Ahead In Drugs War
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Martin Cooke (mjc1947@cyberclub.iol.ie)
Pubdate: May 26 1999
Source: Times, The (UK)
Copyright: 1999 Times Newspapers Ltd
Contact: letters@the-times.co.uk
Website: http://www.the-times.co.uk/
Author: Richard Ford, Home Correspondent

SMUGGLERS ARE STILL AHEAD IN DRUGS WAR

The war against drugs in Britain is being lost, with more substances
being smuggled into the country causing a collapse in street prices
and threatening a new heroin epidemic.

Jack Cunningham, the Cabinet enforcer, issued a warning of the danger
facing young people from a flood of cheaper and purer heroin as the
Government set ambitious new targets designed to reduce hard drugs
abuse.

Dr Cunningham highlighted the failure of attempts to control illegal
import of drugs when he said that though seizures had increased
significantly there had hardly been any effect on supplies reaching
the streets.

"Seizures of illegal drugs have increased tenfold but the availability
on the streets has not declined. We know that heroin is available in
higher quantities in greater purity than ever before". The minister,
who has responsibility for co-ordinating drugs policy added: "If you
have a purer, cheaper product on the streets it clearly poses a
serious threat to young people. Whether it is an epidemic is too early
to say but that is the situation we are facing. We clearly have to
watch this situation very, very carefully."

His warning came after a grim assessment of the effectiveness of the
UKP1.4 billion fight to curb drugs by Customs and Excise which said
that there was increased demand in the country leading to more
substances coming in.

Dr Cunningham accused sports stars and public figures who took cocaine
of undermining the drive to curb drugs abuse. "It gives an abysmal,
appalling example to young people. There is no glamour in drug-taking
and associating drug-taking with success in life is pathetic. There is
no doubt if some sports star or huge public figure presents themselves
as a drug-taker, it does have an undermining effect on what we are
trying to achieve."

Dame Valerie Strachan, chairman of Customs and Excise, told MPs that
the country had a serious drugs problem. "I do not delude myself that
we are winning the war against drugs." She was speaking only hours
before Dr Cunningham and Keith Hellawell, the Government's drugs
supremo, announced targets to curb heroin and cocaine abuse and a
renewed drive to break the link between drug-taking and criminal activity.

Unveiling a ten-year strategy, both men said that there would be a
shift towards drugs education and prevention. The plan set a series of
targets. The proportion of people aged 16-25 using cocaine and heroin
is to be cut by half by 2008 and by 25 per cent by 2003, the number of
11-16 year olds using Class A drugs is to be cut by 20 per cent by
2002.

Other targets include reducing by half by 2008 repeat offending by
drug-using criminals and by 25 per cent by 2005; increasing the number
of drug users in treatment programmes by 66 per cent by 2003 and 100
per cent by 2008. Dr Cunningham defended the absence of any baseline
figures in the plan by arguing that existing statistics were "fragile"
and "inadequate". Drugs charities welcomed the Government's new
targets but cautioned that drug

services would be placed under substantial pressure unless more money
was found to help them to meet rising demand. In some cases people can
wait six months to get treatment and some residential centres have
been forced to close through lack of funding.

Steve Taylor, of the Standing Conference of Drug Abuse, said it would
take a long time to achieve a significant drop in misuse of drugs.
"This is like trying to turn round a supertanker."
-------------------------------------------------------------------

What A Waste As Drugs Tsar Keith Hellawell Publishes His First Annual Audit
(An op-ed in the Guardian, in Britain, by Professor Howard Parker, director
of the drugs research centre at Manchester University, argues that the coming
shortfall in treatment funding could have been avoided but for misplaced
faith in prevention and enforcement. The overall budget is biased against
treatment, even though we know what works, because the other two sectors are
generously funded for political, not proficiency, reasons.)

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 20:44:00 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: UK: What A Waste As Drugs Tsar
Keith Hellawell Publishes His First
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: EWCHIEF
Pubdate: Wed, 26 May 1999
Source: Guardian, The (UK)
Copyright: Guardian Media Group 1999
Contact: letters@guardian.co.uk
Website: http://www.guardian.co.uk/

WHAT A WASTE AS DRUGS TSAR KEITH HELLAWELL PUBLISHES HIS FIRST ANNUAL
AUDIT

Howard Parker argues that millions have been poured down the drain on
prevention and enforcement rather than treatment

There are few public service sectors left which are not now subject to
routine audit and inspection. Each service has mission statements,
charters, performance indicators and effectiveness reviews. Most are
published and public debate is routine. Best value has even found its way
into local authority services.

Yet one burgeoning service industry, drugs interventions - through
prevention, enforcement and treatment - remains largely unaccountable.
Despite an annual bill of pounds 1.5 billion, rising rapidly, there are no
routine audits, inspections or league tables.

The treatment sector is funded by an odd mix of local authority community
care money plus large doses of health trust money (from the DoH). And
because `voluntaries' play a key role, the whole industry is propped up by
vast amounts of ad hoc money from the European social fund and the National
Lotteries Board - whose audits are regarded as superficial and easily
satisfied. The `effective' manager here is the one who gets early wind of
the visit and manages to get enough staff and punters into the day room,
workshop or drop-in to give the impression of activity while persuading
the critical staff to take their flexi-time. This dash for cash culture
pervades drugs services.

Extraordinarily, there is still no formal education and training route into
the industry. With no national standards and few courses in further or
higher education, nursing, teaching, youth and community and social work
qualifications are all accepted, as are degrees from the University of Life
as an ex-addict. Appointing medical practitioners is equally `flexible',
with national adverts routinely producing no high quality applicants:
specialists in the industry are often migrants from psychiatry or general
practice who are self learners in the specialism.

All this was understandable during the 1980s, but no government since then
has taken responsibility. This neglect will, unless rectified, lead to a
crisis - particularly in treatment delivery - early in the new millennium.

For the first time in the UK we have a drugs co-ordination strategy. There
are targets to reduce over 10 years adolescent drug taking and heroin use
among under 25s; to increase the number of problem drug users receiving
treatment and to reduce drug related crime. Some of these targets will be
met (reducing drug related school exclusions), some will not (reducing the
number of heroin users) and some are probably unmeasurable.

This strategy is being managed by the UK anti drugs coordinator unit, drugs
tsars and a network of over 100 drug action teams (in England and Wales)
to provide the delivery infrastructure.

And over the next few years further new money will flow into the industry
from the voluntary sector and the treasury. England and Wales will receive
an additional pounds 214 million of taxpayers' money. Most of this is to
provide a new option to the courts to coerce drug driven offenders into
treatment as an alternative to custody. This policy is based on robust
`what works' evidence, and is likely to do well if the courts are
imaginative enough and the supervision and treatment services are of a
high enough standard. Prisons are also receiving a significant testing and
treatment provision.

Other areas which will benefit include dedicated young persons' services
and rehabilitation schemes which are funded at the local
authority/community care level.

However, all this will still not be enough. We already have waiting lists
of up to six months at drug units, and there is a new, largely `untreated'
population of heroin and crack cocaine users netted in the criminal justice
system who are not on any waiting lists.

Despite having the largest recreational drugs scene in Europe across the
1990s, the UK has not had the most problematic. During the first half of
the 1990s heroin use and crack use were climbing fairly slowly. However as
we leave the 1990s the prognosis looks bleak. Britain (not Northern
Ireland) is in the early stages of a second heroin epidemic involving very
young users which is particularly affecting Scotland and north and south
west England. The new heroin users are in small cities and towns with no
heroin history and therefore no services.

Those metropolitan areas in England which hosted heroin outbreaks in the
1980s - London, Manchester and Liverpool - are currently not as affected,
but they are seeing an increase in cocaine powder and crack cocaine use.
This is a worrying scenario - a high demand for treatment services for
heroin in the regions with few services and high levels of stimulant, and
crack use in the metropolitan areas which are traditionally geared to
prescribing methadone. Yet we don't have a cocaine substitute to prescribe
- there is no cocadone. The epidemiological forecast is thus bleak as the
traditionally separate recreational and problem drugs arenas begin to overlap.

The coming shortfall in treatment provision could have been avoided but for
misplaced faith in prevention and enforcement. The overall budget is biased
against treatment, even though we know what works, because the other two
sectors are generously funded for political, not proficiency, reasons. The
rhetoric says we must educate our children from the nursery to resist drugs
and we must lock up the dealers of death and throw away the key.

Alas neither approach works - more people are taking more drugs more often
- and as insiders well know millions of pounds of taxpayers' money have
been wasted in both sectors. Yet this cannot be discussed because there is
no impartial, `objective' scrutiny. No one has the authority to ask the
right questions beyond ad hoc parliamentary committees.

Instead, the whole apparatus bumbles on in bad faith. No scrutinies are
undertaken and what little inspectorial apparatus there was is now
delegated to help health trusts commission new drugs services. All three
staff of the substance misuse advisory service are this way employed!
Symbolic gestures at templating good practice are under way, and local
drug action teams are being pressed to be more articulate about the local
plans. But all this is window dressing. The big picture remains unshown.
This is why we need an Offdrug to provide a comprehensive review of the
industry and ensure it becomes more effective and efficient and far more
subject to both parliamentary and public scrutiny.

The government is missing the boat over drugs because having devolved -
some would say unloaded - the problem on to the drug tsar's office, Labour
is muffling the significance of the unfolding situation.

If political credibility becomes the lever for change then so be it. A more
fitting motivation would be the thousands of very young, increasingly
addicted heroin users around Britain whom no one is currently helping until
they become burglars or chaotic injecting poly drug users.

Professor Howard Parker directs the drugs research centre in the department
of social policy and social work at Manchester University.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

This Man Is Paid 106,000 A Year To Stop Britain's Youth Taking Drugs. Is He
Worth It? (The Independent says that 16 months after Keith Hellawell was
appointed "drugs tsar" by the British Government to spearhead a new
anti-drugs crusade, criticism is mounting that he has failed to grasp the
detail of his job. "He is aloof, uninspiring and out of touch," said a senior
academic in the drugs field yesterday. "Worst of all, he is out of his depth.
He is simply not bright enough. He can't hold all the balls up in the air."
In a recent radio interview, Hellawell told listeners that doctors are not
allowed to prescribe diamorphine, more commonly known as heroin, to addicts -
which isn't true. One observer described his appointment as a poisoned
chalice. "New Labour has unloaded the political embarrassment of its failing
drugs policy on to the drugs tsar," he said. "As a figurehead, Keith
Hellawell serves that purpose.")

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 17:28:46 -0700
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: UK: This Man Is Paid UKP106,000 A Year To Stop Britain's Youth
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Martin Cooke (mjc1947@cyberclub.iol.ie)
Pubdate: 26 May 1999
Source: Independent, The (UK)
Copyright: 1999 Independent Newspapers (UK) Ltd.
Contact: letters@independent.co.uk
Address: 1 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London E14 5DL
Website: http://www.independent.co.uk/
Author: Kathy Marks

THIS MAN IS PAID UKP106,000 A YEAR TO STOP BRITAIN'S YOUTH TAKING
DRUGS. IS HE WORTH IT?

Keith Hellawell, the Government's "drugs tsar", told listeners to a
recent radio interview that doctors are not allowed to prescribe
diamorphine, more commonly known as heroin, to addicts.

Quite what the listeners made of this remark is not clear. But all
over Whitehall - at the Home Office, the Department of Health and the
Cabinet Office, where Mr Hellawell is based - civil servants cringed
with embarrassment. The gaffe - doctors can indeed prescribe
diamorphine, provided they have a special licence - illustrates a
recurring criticism of the UK anti-drugs co-ordinator, to give him his
proper title: that he has failed to grasp the detail of his job.

"He is aloof, uninspiring and out of touch," said a senior academic in
the drugs field yesterday. "Worst of all, he is out of his depth. He
is simply not bright enough. He can't hold all the balls up in the
air."

Harsh words, but they were not untypical of the views expressed by
drugs experts and voluntary workers yesterday, 16 months after Mr
Hellawell was appointed by the Government to spearhead a new
anti-drugs crusade.

Mr Hellawell, a former chief constable of West Yorkshire, was selected
for the UKP106,000-a-year post because of his long-standing interest
in drugs issues and his reputation for being prepared to "think the
unthinkable".

Ironically, the initial concerns expressed about him - that, because
of his background, he would concentrate exclusively on law enforcement
aspects of the job - have proved unfounded. In fact, he has shifted
the emphasis to education and rehabilitation, making clear that he
believes the problem cannot be solved by simply arresting and locking
up addicts.

His 10-year strategy, unveiled in April last year, included a new
penalty obliging criminals to undergo treatment for drug addiction. It
also promised improved drugs education in schools and the
establishment of a national Drugs Prevention Advisory Service to
support local drug action teams in the community. Even Mr Hellawell's
detractors say the strategy looks good on paper, encompassing every
conceivable angle. There is also grudging admiration for his success
in squeezing UKP217m out of the Treasury to implement it.

But there remains widespread scepticism about whether Mr Hellawell, a
former miner who now drives a Porsche, has the authority, courage and
vision to pick his way through the political minefield and make real
progress in the fight against drugs.

Many observers draw a contrast with his deputy, Mike Trace, who is
seen as brighter, more accessible and more in touch with youth issues.
Mr Trace, who rides a motorbike, is a former social worker who worked
in the voluntary drugs field.

"Mike Trace holds the whole thing together. He has a far better grasp
of the detail and he works his socks off," said one Hellawell critic.
"He is immensely relaxed and well-respected."

Out in the field, experts picked their words more carefully. Mr
Hellawell, after all, is the public face of government drugs policy and
voluntary agencies are largely dependent on government funding. "It would be
suicide to criticise him," said one.

Roger Howard, chief executive of the Standing Conference on Drug
Abuse, was among the few prepared to speak on the record yesterday. He
praised Mr Hellawell for his willingness to heed the views of people
working at the sharp end.

Mike Goodman, director of Release, the drugs charity, described Mr
Hellawell, diplomatically, as a safe pair of hands. "Certainly we
could have done worse," he said.

"He's not a great communicator, but he is amiable, and parts of his strategy
are very good. I wish that he would be more outspoken sometimes, that he
would tackle the difficult issues such as decriminalisation, which I believe
that he supports."

This is a persistent criticism made of Mr Hellawell: that he has abandoned
his liberal, occasionally maverick, views and is toeing the Government's hard
line on drugs.

As a police officer, he was prepared to advocate reform of the
"absurd" laws on prostitution and the legalisation of brothels. He
also said, in an interview on the BBC's Panorama programme, that he
foresaw the day when cannabis would be legal. After being appointed to
his post, he disowned that comment.

There is no doubt that Mr Hellawell is in a difficult position. He is
"drugs tsar", modelled on an American concept, but unlike his American
counterparts he has no budget, no independence and no real power. He
is, in reality, just a special adviser, yet, unlike other government
special advisers, he has a high profile.

There is no doubt, too, that he has suffered from snobbishness and
elitism at the hands of some senior civil servants, who resented an
outsider - and, worst of all, a police officer - being parachuted in
above their heads. "What's a copper doing in Whitehall?" people would
whisper after he arrived.

One government adviser on drugs, who knows him well, said yesterday:
"There were people who fell over backwards at drinks parties when he
was appointed. In reality, he has not done badly. But he does not have
the sagacity to understand the larger issues. I doubt that the
benefits of his job are worth the cost."

Another observer described his appointment as a poisoned chalice.

"New Labour has unloaded the political embarrassment of its failing
drugs policy on to the drugs tsar," he said. "As a figurehead, Keith
Hellawell serves that purpose."

-------------------------------------------------------------------

[End]

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