Portland NORML News - Saturday, March 20, 1999
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Putting pot in its place (A staff editorial in the Oregonian mischaracterizes
the Institute of Medicine assessment of medical marijuana, asserting that the
report's endorsement of medical marijuana is quite limited and making too
much of its suggestion that the "widespread smoking of pot is not the best
route." Oddly, the newspaper vaguely contradicts itself, faulting the
Oregon Medical Marijuana Act for being "weak.")


Newshawk: Portland NORML (http://www.pdxnorml.org/)
Pubdate: Sat, Mar 20 1999
Source: Oregonian, The (OR)
Copyright: 1999 The Oregonian
Contact: letters@news.oregonian.com
Address: 1320 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201
Fax: 503-294-4193
Website: http://www.oregonlive.com/
Forum: http://forums.oregonlive.com/

Editorial: Putting pot in its place

* Comprehensive medical marijuana report from respected source makes case
for further study - and against widespread use

The nearly universal call during Oregon's debate over medical marijuana last
fall was for more research into the health effects of the drug.

An Institute of Medicine report released this week answers that call in
part, indicating that marijuana's active ingredients can help relieve pain,
nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite in people with cancer or AIDS.

But the report's own primary call is for more research, and rightly so. Five
of the six recommendations in the two-year study involve finding out more
about the physiological and psychological effects of the compounds in
marijuana, about how to take them safely and about the health risks of
smoking marijuana.

Beyond that, the report's endorsement of medical marijuana is quite limited.
In the vast majority of cases, it said, already-available drugs are more
effective in relieving symptoms. The study endorsed smoking marijuana only
under very narrow circumstances, such as by terminally ill people. And it
trained an eye on developing derivative drugs and a safer way to use them,
such as an inhaler.

The report gives more reason to believe that the compounds in marijuana have
some medical benefits. But it also reinforces the impression that medical
marijuana is not widely or unquestionably valuable, and that smoking
marijuana as medicine remains a crude and even dangerous practice. There is
still no way to control the dose or the quality of the smoked drug, and
smoking it can result in other health problems.

Nor does the report boost the credibility of Oregon's medical marijuana law,
which remains weak, vague and contradictory. For one thing, the law applies
to a much larger group of people than the report suggests should use medical
marijuana. For example, the law permits marijuana use for glaucoma. The
report specifically found no support for using the drug to treat glaucoma,
nor did it find much evidence that it can help with problems such as
Parkinson's disease or Huntington's disease.

The Legislature soon will consider whether to amend the law, using as a
starting point House Bill 3052 by Rep. Kevin Mannix, R-Salem, chairman of
the House Judiciary Criminal Law Committee. Mannix believes the law gives
too much cover to people who aren't ill to smoke, grow and deal marijuana.

Mannix has a point, and people who are truly interested only in marijuana's
medical effects will support efforts to tighten up the law. We still have
our doubts that good medicine is the main goal of the law's most ardent
supporters - or its most ardent opponents - but time, and challenges such
as Mannix's, will tell.

For the moment, the Institute of Medicine's report's call for more research
on and refinement of how the active ingredients in marijuana might help
people is welcome. Equally welcome is its clear message that the widespread
smoking of pot is not the best route.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

The Humane Approach (A letter to the editor of the Oregonian says the mass
media are spinning the Institute of Medicine report. People should read the
report for themselves.)

Date: Sun, 21 Mar 1999 18:19:38 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US OR: PUB LTE: The Humane Approach
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Perjanstr@aol.com
Pubdate: Sat, 20 Mar 1999
Source: Oregonian, The (OR)
Copyright: 1999 The Oregonian
Contact: letters@news.oregonian.com
Address: 1320 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201
Fax: 503-294-4193
Website: http://www.oregonlive.com/
Forum: http://forums.oregonlive.com/
Author: perry

THE HUMANE APPROACH

All are spinning it their way. The Oregonian editors, long term
war-heads, as most angry, old, rich white, republican males can be,
declare the report proves that MJ is not "good" medicine. Want more
"study", like McDrugCzar.

The only studying going on around here is patients, with police
assistance, studying the floor, then a jail cell. Then a piece of
paper they can sign and lose everything but keep their wife and kids
from being included in the "conspiracy".

We've got to get the report to the people, show them how their leaders
are "reacting" to these facts and get them out to fire these bums.

perry
Pdx NORML
Portland, OR
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Is This Really America? (A list subscriber forwards a first-person account
from Twin Falls, Idaho, illustrating how the war on marijuana users has led
to blatant disregard by cops for Fourth Amendment protections against
unwarranted searches.)

Delivered-To: fixup-restore@crrh.org@fixme
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 1999 23:18:28 -0800
To: restore@crrh.org
From: "D. Paul Stanford" (stanford@crrh.org)
From: "CRRH mailing list" (restore@crrh.org)
Subject: TWIN FALLS COPS - KATHY'S STORY

From: " Joe Hart & Kay Lee" (mrjah@flakeysol.com)

IS THIS REALLY AMERICA?
Date: 3/20/1999, Time:5:20 pm
whitehawklion@computer-depot.com

I was sitting in my house with a friend and his eight year old daughter. We
were just getting on the internet to gather some info when there was a knock
at the door. I went to the door and my heart sank: It was three local Twin
Falls policemen, Officers Ryan, Skylar, and Smith. Officer Ryan introduced
himself as the head officer on duty that shift. I stepped outside and shut
the door behind me.

They said Canyon View Hospital had called them stating that I was suicidal.
I replied that I was not and that there was no reason for them to be there.
They asked me if someone was in the house with me, and when I said yes, they
wanted to know who it was. I told them it was a friend and a child. They
asked again who it was and wanted to know if it was a male or female. I told
them my friend was male.

They then asked me if I had marijuana in the house and I replied no. They
said they could smell marijuana.

Then they asked for my friend to come outside. I came inside and shut the
door, telling my friend that they wanted to talk to him. They began
knocking on the door again and we both went outside. One officer took my
friend aside and asked him what his name was, if there was any marijuana in
the house and if we were smoking it. My friend told them no, no marijuana
was in the house. The officer asked for his ID and they walked to his truck
so he could show it to them. The cop called my friend's name in after asking
him if he had any warrants, and asked him again a couple more times if there
was any marijuana in the house, and my friend continued to repeat, "no, not
as far as I know."

I am a medical patient in my fifties. I am facing state marijuana charges
because my exboyfriend-turned-snitch had me busted after an argument. My
first hearing had been earlier in the day, and in court, he had handed me
what seemed like a threatening note. When the police officers asked why I
had called Canyon View Hospital, I explained about the note.

They then asked me what I had been in court for, and I told them that I
didn't have to answer any more questions without my lawyer present, and told
them I was going to call him. They told me I could not do that until they
searched my house. I told them they could not search without a warrant, but
they said they had probable cause because they could smell marijuana. Once
again, I told them that they needed a warrant, and that I would not let them
in. They said they didn't need a warrant, that smelling marijuana was
probable cause. I said, "This is a violation of my fourth amendment right,
and that I would not let them in, but they threatened to arrest me if I did
not grant them entry. I stood in front of my door and insisted they needed a
warrant. They pushed me aside and said, "We're coming in whether you like it
or not."

Two came inside and one stayed outside with my friend. They told the child
to go outside, and said that if they saw nothing in plain view they would
leave. When they came in they looked around my front room, and in my
kitchen. One officer saw my new book, "Marijuana Medical Handbook," and
asked me if I smoked for medicinal purposes. I was honest when I said "yes,
I do." He warned me that it is illegal in Idaho.

They walked toward the door and we went outside. I told I them I wanted
their names and said I would sue them for violation of my rights. They
reluctantly gave me their names, but laughed at me and told me to go ahead
and sue them. While the two cops were inside, the other officer asked my
friend again if there was marijuana in the house, he replied, "no, I told
you, not as far as I know." The officer also asked my friend if he smoked
marijuana. My friend replied "I have in the past."

Also, I would like to note that the neighbor kids were all out in the street
and witnessed much of the happenings outside. Also, toward the end of their
intrusion, the police asked me if I was depressed, and I told them no, that
I was afraid. Every time I have called them in the past regarding domestic
violence they have done nothing to help me, even when I had a protection
order.

The first part of this story occurred on Jan. 26th, 1999, and I will have
that written soon. Thanks to all the warriors and people who care.

Kathy Tadlock in Twin Falls, Idaho
whitehawklion@computer-depot.com

By the way, as part of my spirituality, I often burn sage, sweetgrass, cedar
and incense. It is interesting to note that sweetgrass and cedar smell a lot
like marijuana.

The one thing that made me feel the most violated when they came in the
first time, was that they took my healing crystal out of the bowl of sea
salt it was sitting in (I use it to balance chakras) and in conjunction with
Reiki sometimes. They just left it sitting there. These cops obviously have
no concept of, nor respect for spirit or spirituality of any kind.

I can see the headlines "Healer is busted for marijuana." I am trying to
keep a sense of humor here because I don't like being full of anger. I have
been fighting for my life all my life. When do I get to live? Some days I
just don't know if I have the physical stamina to do this, or even the court
thing, but it is really encouraging to know there is true hope for "we the
people" to resist this drug war insanity.

My boyfriend said he feels remorse, and that his dead mothers voice came to
tell him what he did was wrong. That's just part of it: He also mentioned
some people have made threats to him and he doesn't want anyone else to get
hurt. He said the police offered him money (a) to make three buys they
would pay him up front $50 each, and after court he would get a bonus of up
to $1000. He would not comply, so they started harassing him. I got much of
this conversation on tape, but he says we can meet at my lawyers office, and
he will tell him the real story. He says he didn't make the phone calls,
that the police must have made the rest up to get their probable cause. He
says he will help me prove this, because he said he is afraid of perjury
charges. I told him if he can help prove the cops lied, we can sue them for
perjury and he won't have to worry about it. Am I right?

Distributed by Kay Lee
mrjah@flakeysol.com
909 Virginia Street #B
Key West, FL. 33040
305-293-1865

Kathy's being terrorized because she dared to ask for her trial.
It is dangerous to demand your rights when your government is wrong.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Lockyer Gives Quiet OK To S.F. Pot Clubs (According to the San Francisco
Chronicle, California Attorney General Bill Lockyer told San Francisco
authorities yesterday that medical marijuana distribution in the city can
proceed if it continues discreetly, so federal authorities won't feel the
need to intervene. Lockyer tacitly acknowledged medical marijuana is quietly
being dispensed in San Francisco despite the ruling last year by U.S.
District Judge Charles Breyer ordering the closure of the Cannabis
Cultivators Club.)

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 07:34:26 -0800
To: editor@mapinc.org
From: "Tom O'Connell" (tjeffoc@sirius.com)
Subject: DPFCA: News Item in SF Chronicle
Sender: owner-dpfca@drugsense.org
Reply-To: "Tom O'Connell" (tjeffoc@sirius.com)
Organization: DrugSense http://www.drugsense.org/dpfca/
PubDate: Saturday, March 20, 1999
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Page A15
URL:http://www.sfgate.com/

LOCKYER GIVES QUIET OK TO S.F. POT CLUBS

But Distribution Should Be Discreet And Low-profile

Edward Epstein, Chronicle Staff Writer

California's attorney general told San Francisco authorities
yesterday that medicinal marijuana distribution in the city can
proceed if it is done discreetly, so that federal authorities do
not feel the need to intervene.

The advice from Bill Lockyer, who supported the passage of
Proposition 215 in 1996, was a tacit recognition that pot is
quietly being dispensed for medicinal use in San Francisco.

The distribution is taking place even though U.S. District Judge
Charles Breyer ordered the high-profile Cannabis Cultivators Club
shut down last year for violating federal law. The court order
also closed a few other big Bay Area pot clubs.

``I respect local community values,'' Lockyer said after a meeting
in the office of Board of Supervisors President Tom Ammiano.
Others on hand included San Francisco District Attorney Terence
Hallinan, City Attorney Louise Renne and Dr. Mitch Katz, director
of the city's Department of Public Health.

``If local law enforcement is supportive of implementation of
Proposition 215 and their policies don't provoke outside
prosecution, I have no intention of intervening,'' added Lockyer,
a Democrat who was elected in November to replace Dan Lungren, who
vigorously opposed legalizing the medicinal use of marijuana.

Lungren dueled with Dennis Peron, founder of the Cannabis
Cultivators Club, but it was the federal government that finally
shut down the 9,000-member operation.

Since then, smaller groups have quietly tried to take up the
slack. They work with Hallinan's office to ensure that patients
produce verifiable recommendations for treatment from doctors, and
they shun publicity in order to avoid federal attention.

A reporter's call to one of them to ask about its operations
brought this response: ``I can't comment. We're trying to stay
open. The city is well aware of what we're up to.''

``My advice to them is to keep their heads down. Keep a low
profile,'' Hallinan said after the late-afternoon meeting.

One pot club that will comment is the Oakland Cannabis Buyers
Club, which is appealing Breyer's order. It is still taking in
patients, but instead of dispensing pot, it refers them to other
organizations that distribute the substance.

``I think Lockyer can defy the feds,'' said the Oakland club's
Jeff Jones. Lockyer has appointed a task force to determine how
California can implement Proposition 215, despite federal
disapproval.

``If the task force were to say that clubs can't operate because
of the federal government, then they aren't being creative
enough,'' Jones added.

Ammiano said he took heart from Lockyer's words. ``If we attempt
to distribute marijuana to those who are verifiably sick, and if
that is not done with an in-your-face attitude, we can almost
guarantee that those people's needs will be met,'' he said.

The office of U.S. Attorney Robert Mueller declined to comment on
Lockyer's statement that low-key pot distribution probably would
not spark a federal response. Calls were referred to Washington,
D.C., where Justice Department offices were already closed.

Lockyer also said he plans to lobby in Washington on Monday along
with attorneys general from other Western states that have passed
pot propositions. Bolstered by a study released this week that
showed marijuana is effective in combatting the side effects of
some diseases, they want marijuana reclassified by the federal
government as a less-dangerous substance.

They also want the government to step up its research into
marijuana's medical uses.

Those at the meeting discussed having the city Department of
Public Health get into the medicinal pot distribution business.
But both Lockyer and Ammiano said there are many unanswered
questions about such direct city involvement.

For now, Ammiano suggested, the city will explore the idea of
having the department help verify that patients' referrals from
doctors are genuine.

San Francisco Chronicle Page A15
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Lockyer Suggests Medical Marijuana Be Distributed Quietly (The Associated
Press version in the Sacramento Bee)

Date: Sun, 21 Mar 1999 10:50:16 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US CA: WIRE: MMJ: Lockyer Suggests Medical Marijuana Be
Distributed Quietly
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: compassion23@geocities.com (Frank S. World)
Pubdate: Sat, 20 Mar 1999
Source: Sacramento Bee (CA)
Copyright: 1999 The Sacramento Bee
Contact: opinion@sacbee.com
Address: P.O.Box 15779, Sacramento, CA 95852
Feedback: http://www.sacbee.com/about_us/sacbeemail.html
Website: http://www.sacbee.com/
Forum: http://www.sacbee.com/voices/voices_forum.html

LOCKYER SUGGESTS MEDICAL MARIJUANA BE DISTRIBUTED QUIETLY

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Attorney General Bill Lockyer told San Francisco
authorities to let pot clubs dispense marijuana for medicinal use if they
can do so discreetly.

"If local law enforcement is supportive of implementation of Proposition 215
and their policies don't provoke outside prosecution, I have no intention of
intervening," said Lockyer, a Democrat who supported the 1996 ballot
initiative to legalize pot for medical use.

His predecessor, Republican Dan Lungren, was an aggressive opponent of
medicinal marijuana who sought repeatedly to shut down San Francisco's
Cannabis Cultivators Club.

Last year, U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer ordered the shutdown of
several San Francisco Bay area pot emporiums, including the San Francisco
club, for violating federal laws against marijuana distribution.

On Friday, Lockyer met with Tom Ammiano, president of the city's Board of
Supervisors; District Attorney Terence Halllinan; City Attorney Louise
Renne; and Dr. Mitchell Katz, director of the city's Department of Public
Health.

"I respect local community values," Lockyer said.

Lockyer has appointed a task force to determine how California can implement
Proposition 215, despite federal disapproval. He said he and the attorneys
general of other Western states with similar pot propositions plan to lobby
in Washington on Monday.

"I think Lockyer can defy the feds," said Jeff Jones of the Oakland Cannabis
Buyers Club, which no longer dispenses pot but refers patients to groups
that are distributing the drug.

The U.S. Attorney's office declined to comment on Lockyer's statement that
quiet pot distribution probably would not spark federal prosecution.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Life As A Drug War Prisoner (The web site promoting the campaign of
Libertarian Steve Kubby for governor of California in 2002 releases a
heartbreaking first-person account of the prosecution of Pete Brady, the
medical-marijuana patient and journalist who faces up to four years in prison
for interviewing Kubby.)

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 15:46:56 -0500
To: medmj@drcnet.org, drctalk@drcnet.org, restore@crrh.org,
friends@freecannabis.org
From: Richard Lake (rlake@mapinc.org)
Subject: DPFCA: LIFE AS A DRUG WAR PRISONER by Pete Brady (FWD)
Sender: owner-dpfca@drugsense.org
Reply-To: Richard Lake 
Organization: DrugSense http://www.drugsense.org/dpfca/

LIFE AS A DRUG WAR PRISONER
by Pete Brady

Journalists seldom have the opportunity to write about a news story in which
the journalist himself is the topic. Now that I am the subject of news
rather than just a reporter of it, I realize more than ever how important it
is to accurately depict reality.

My reality, which involves drug charges that could land me in prison for
four or more years, began in 1991 when I suffered a severe workplace injury.
My HMO doctor prescribed bucketfuls of narcotics, explaining that although
he preferred to do expensive tests on my injured spine, he was prevented
from doing so by HMO cost-cutting policies.

I became addicted to prescription drugs, mired in an abyss of despair and
dependency. By the time the accountants allowed doctors to run those
expensive tests, all they could do was confirm that my injury required
immediate surgery, but the hastily-arranged operation did more harm than
good.

More drugs, more surgery were the unwelcome options offered. I tried to
return to work, but was unable to fulfill my duties. I reluctantly
surrendered to my disability in 1994, and began searching for ways to save
my life.

I studied anatomy, physiology, anthropology, psychology. I began healing
myself with yoga, physical therapy, diet, and prayer. I also discovered
medical marijuana, used for centuries as a pain reliever, muscle relaxant,
anti-depressant, and anti-inflammatory.

Cannabis helped me escape the spiral of depression and injury. I moved to
Chico to begin graduate school, and started growing my own medicine rather
than go through the risk and expense of finding it in a town where I knew
nobody.

My long-time partner and I settled in a middle-class East Chico
neighborhood. We were the most pleasant neighbors anybody could want. We
babysat for the busy couple next door, spent most of our time studying,
attending classes or exercising, never had visitors or parties.

I loved my marijuana plants because they helped save my life. I bred special
genetic strains, carefully documenting how each affected me.

Sometimes, I put my plants outside so they could breathe clean air and bask
in real sun. Somebody saw them and reported me to the Narcotics Task Force.

In December, 1994, my fragile rehabilitation came crashing down along with
the front door to my home, when a dozen police officers threw me to the
floor and put guns to my head. I'd never been arrested; their search and
interrogation techniques trashed my home and scarred my soul. I didn't just
lose medicine, property and money that day, I also lost faith in America.

Charged with multiple felonies and deprived of my herbal medicine, I again
began taking toxic prescription drugs. After 18 months of despondency,
anxiety and confusing legal proceedings, during which I realized that
everything I'd believed about the justice system was a na´ve fiction, I was
forced to plead guilty to one count of cultivating marijuana.

Prosecutor Teresa Kludt wanted me condemned to state prison. Superior Court
Judge Anne Rutherford considered the fact that I had just completed, with
honors, an interdisciplinary masters degree. She looked at my medical
records and community service. Showing compassion and wisdom, she sentenced
me to unsupervised probation.

I had begun writing about marijuana in 1995. Pro-marijuana High Times
magazine began publishing my work. I've since reported on the drug war,
ecology, social justice, health, and spirituality for many prestigious
publications, including the Chico News and Review.

When voters passed the medical marijuana law (Proposition 215) in 1996, I
already had a doctor's recommendation for marijuana, and believed the new law
allowed my medical use.

Whenever my health permitted it, I did adventurous journalism assignments. I
rode with an anti-marijuana helicopter crew. I interviewed smugglers,
growers, Nobel Prize winners, activists like Julia Butterfly Hill, Dennis
Peron and Jack Herer.

In early 1999, I interviewed Libertarian Party candidate for governor Steve
Kubby, a cancer survivor and medical marijuana politician who grows his own
medicine. Surveillance police were peering into his house the day I
visited. They saw me taking pictures of his pot plant, and assumed I was
part of a criminal conspiracy.

On January 21, two days after Kubby and his wife were arrested for growing
pot, the Butte County Sheriff's Marijuana Eradication Unit visited my house.
Officers found a meager amount of dried marijuana. They also allege to have
found "illegal cactus." I was charged with probation violation, felony
cactus and possession of marijuana.

I later discovered that the main purpose of my arrest was to pressure me
into implicating Kubby in an alleged conspiracy. But the candidate and I
engaged in no criminal activity, unless journalism itself is a crime.

Innocence doesn't matter - the system inexorably has commenced ripping me to
pieces. I've already lost $1200 posting bail. Dogged by headaches and
musculoskeletal pain, I can't sleep. Every time a car pulls up in front of my
house, I brace for another house-trashing, another interrogation.

Deputy District Attorney Clare Keithley said that if I use my medicine,
she'll have me thrown in jail. A federal misdemeanor probation arising from
my 1994 arrest which expired the very day I was arrested this year, has also
been violated; I now face federal and state prison sentences. Taxpayers will
spend $25,000 a year to cage me like an animal.

I wish I could feel legitimate guilt, but loving plants and writing about
them and people who love them is nothing I can apologize for. Simply put,
our government is spending billions of your tax dollars every year to harm
people who have harmed no one, not even themselves. My neighbors, even the
ultra-conservative ones, love me. Further, they oppose most aspects of the
drug war, especially the war against marijuana and the persecution of people
like me. They know I am no criminal; the worst I can be accused of is being
a crippled, struggling man plagued by his own fallibility and the
vicissitudes of injustice.

Beyond all the obvious horrors of the war on plants- its shattered lives and
wasted money, its propagation of brutality and dismantling of the
Constitution- are wounded souls like me who seek natural medicine and just
enough freedom to save our lives.

These days, I spend much time in prayer, beseeching God's spirit to change
the hearts of the prosecutors and police. I also ask God to free me from
physical pain, from anger and fear, from the unavoidable realization that my
own country wants to kill me and other medical marijuana users.

For a few precious seconds, a touch of grace releases me from the bonds of
worry. It's springtime, I realize. I could be out in the park with my lover,
enjoying the flowers and butterflies. Instead, I'm an endless casualty,
already a prisoner of the drug war.

***

K U B B Y F O R G O V E R N O R
1998 CALIFORNIA 2002
http://www.kubby.com

***

Join the Kubby Announce List and get e-mail updates:
Kubby-Announce-on@list.kubby.org

***

Friends, as one who enjoys reading Pete Brady's articles in Cannabis
Culture, High Times and elsewhere, the above, from Steve Kubby's email
list, raises my anger which is what keeps me doing what I do.

That the country I have given a lifetime of military service to would
become so much like it's world war and cold war enemies, jailing it's
citizens by the tens of thousands for political reasons without any
justification based on science or medicine, but only because the have the
power to do it, is not easy to accept.

"America, Where Are You Now?
We Can't Fight Alone Against the Monster"
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Couple Pleads Not Guilty (The Sacramento Bee says Steve Kubby, the 1998
Libertarian gubernatorial candidate in California, and his wife, Michele,
entered not-guilty pleas to cultivation charges Friday in Placer County
Superior Court. A trial date of May 18 was set.)

Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 03:03:36 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US CA: Couple Pleads Not Guilty
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Steve Kubby http://www.kubby.com
Pubdate: 20 March 1999
Source: Sacramento Bee (CA)
Copyright: 1999 The Sacramento Bee
Contact: opinion@sacbee.com
Address: P.O.Box 15779, Sacramento, CA 95852
Feedback: http://www.sacbee.com/about_us/sacbeemail.html
Website: http://www.sacbee.com/
Forum: http://www.sacbee.com/voices/voices_forum.html
Author: Barbara Barte Osborn

COUPLE PLEADS NOT GUILTY

Former Libertarian Party gubernatorial candidate Steve Kubby, 52, and
his wife, Michele, 32, entered not-guilty pleas to drug charges Friday
in Placer County Superior Court.

A trial date of May 18 was set.

The Olympic Valley residents each were charged with cultivating
marijuana, possession of marijuana for sale, two counts of conspiracy
to commit a crime, two counts of possession of a controlled substance,
possession of more than 28.5 grams of marijuana and possession of an
ingestion device. The first four are felonies.

Steve Kubby was also charged with unauthorized possession of a
hypodermic needle or syringe, a misdemeanor.

The couple say they were growing the 265 marijuana plants seized at
their home in a Jan. 19 raid for their own medical use and not for
sale.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Libertarian Candidate Enters Innocent Plea To Drug Charges (The San Francisco
Chronicle version)

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 1999 19:17:05 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US CA: Libertarian Candidate Enters Innocent Plea To Drug
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Michele Kubby http://www.kubby.com
Pubdate: Sat, 20 Mar 1999
Source: San Francisco Chronicle (CA)
Copyright: 1999 San Francisco Chronicle
Contact: chronletters@sfgate.com
Website: http://www.sfgate.com/chronicle/
Forum: http://www.sfgate.com/conferences/

LIBERTARIAN CANDIDATE ENTERS INNOCENT PLEA TO DRUG CHARGES

AUBURN, Calif. -- Former Libertarian Party gubernatorial candidate
Steve Kubby and his wife have entered innocent pleas to drug charges
against them.

Kubby, 52, and his wife, Michele, 32, entered the pleas Friday at
their arraignment in Placer County Superior Court.

The Olympic Valley residents were charged with cultivating marijuana,
possession of marijuana for sale, two counts of conspiracy to commit a
crime, two counts of possession of a controlled substance, possession
of more than 28.5 grams of marijuana and possession of an ingestion
device.

The couple say they were growing the 265 marijuana plants seized at
their home in a Jan. 19 raid for their own medical use and not for
sale.

Steve Kubby, who was diagnosed with adrenal cancer about 15 years ago,
has a Feb. 4 letter from Dr. Vincent DeQuattro, a professor of
medicine at the University of Southern California, stating that Kubby
still has a malignancy, for which the marijuana "in some amazing
fashion ... has not only controlled the symptoms ... but in my view
has arrested the growth."

A trial date of May 18 was set in the same court.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Libertarian Candidate Enters Innocent Plea (The Associated Press version)

Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 21:46:31 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US CA: Wire: Libertarian Candidate Enters Innocent Plea
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Steve Kubby http://www.kubby.com/
Source: The Associated Press
Copyright: 1999 The Associated Press
Pubdate: Sat: 20 Mar 1999

LIBERTARIAN CANDIDATE ENTERS INNOCENT PLEA TO DRUG CHARGES

AUBURN, Calif. (AP) -- Former Libertarian Party gubernatorial candidate
Steve Kubby and his wife have entered innocent pleas to drug charges
against them.

Kubby, 52, and his wife, Michele, 32, entered the pleas Friday at their
arraignment in Placer County Superior Court.

The Olympic Valley residents were charged with cultivating marijuana,
possession of marijuana for sale, two counts of conspiracy to commit a
crime, two counts of possession of a controlled substance, possession of
more than 28.5 grams of marijuana and possession of an ingestion device.

The couple say they were growing the 265 marijuana plants seized at their
home in a Jan. 19 raid for their own medical use and not for sale.

Steve Kubby, who was diagnosed with adrenal cancer about 15 years ago, has
a Feb. 4 letter from Dr. Vincent DeQuattro, a professor of medicine at the
University of Southern California, stating that Kubby still has a
malignancy, for which the marijuana "in some amazing fashion ... has not
only controlled the symptoms ... but in my view has arrested the growth."

A trial date of May 18 was set in the same court.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Invitation to a Trial (A list subscriber forwards information about the trial
beginning Tuesday, March 23, of Steve McWilliams and Dion Markgraaff from San
Diego's Shelter From the Storm Cannabis Collective. McWilliams and Markgraaff
were busted a year ago after the medical marijuana dispensary tried to
deliver a van full of plants to a quadrapeligic patient whose garden had
previously been destroyed by the San Diego county sheriiff's department.)

From: Remembers@webtv.net (Genie Brittingham)
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 17:59:09 -0800 (PST)
To: dpfca@drugsense.org
Subject: DPFCA: Invitation to Trial
Sender: owner-dpfca@drugsense.org
Reply-To: Remembers@webtv.net (Genie Brittingham)
Organization: DrugSense http://www.drugsense.org/dpfca/

From: ontrial@pacbell.net
Date: Sat, Mar 20, 1999,

INVITATION TO A TRIAL

Attention activists--Brothers and Sisters in the cause:

The members of the Shelter From the Storm Cannabis Collective invite you
to join them for the trial of Steve McWilliams and Dion Markgraaff,
Eight o'clock, March 23, 1999; San Diego County Courthouse, Dept. 31;
220 West Broadway, San Diego, California.

As you may remember, this historical case began more than a year ago
when Steve McWilliams was arrested as he attempted to deliver a van full
of plants to a quadrapeligic patient whose medicine garden had
previously been destroyed by the San Diego county sheriiff's department.

The plants were the property and gift of the members of the San Diego
Cannabis Caregivers' Club directed by Dion Markgraaff.

Now comes the time - to tell if acts of courageous compassion are steel
against the prosecutor's blows and the judge's hammer. Please join us as
we celebrate the final chapter in the quest for justice and Safe Access.

peace, The Shelter People

Please contact Barbara MacKenzie at 619 286-2846, ontrial@pacbell.net or
James M. Silva Esq. 310 450-2690
-------------------------------------------------------------------

New Steps Sought Against Drugs, Alcohol (UPI says a poll of Californians by
the Field Institute shows 70 percent favored shifting money from prisons to
treatment programs for alcoholics and other drug abusers.)

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 09:34:04 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US CA: Wire: New Steps Sought Against Drugs, Alcohol
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: General Pulaski
Pubdate: 20 Mar 1999
Source: United Press International
Copyright: 1999 United Press International

NEW STEPS SOUGHT AGAINST DRUGS, ALCOHOL

SACRAMENTO, March 20 (UPI) - California health advocates released a survey
Friday showing strong public support for shifting some taxpayer money from
jails and prisons to alcohol and drug treatment programs. The statewide
Field Institute poll of 1,685 adults also found more than one of every
three said they or their family members had suffered harmful effects from
alcohol and drugs the past two years. Nine in 10 said they believe
education and jobs are top priorities in curbing illegal drug use, and
seven in 10 favored taking some public money from prisons to support
related programs.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

TV Personality Faces Drug Charges (The Des Moines Register says Mark Kennis
of Grimes, Ohio, a former independent candidate for govemor who advocated the
legalization of marijuana and was busted for cultivating it Friday, is also
the host and producer of "Big People News," which focuses on perceived
discrimination against large people.)

Date: Thu, 1 Apr 1999 04:39:07 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US IA: TV Personality Faces Drug Charges
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Carl Olsen
Pubdate: 20 Mar 1999
Source: Des Moines Register (IA)
Copyright: 1999, The Des Moines Register
Contact: letters@news.dmreg.com
Website: http://www.dmregister.com/
Author: Lynn Okamoto (okamotol@news.dmreg.com)

TV PERSONALITY FACES DRUG CHARGES

Grimes, Ia. -- A former independent candidate for govemor who advocated the
legalization of marijuana was apparently growing the illegal plants in his
own home, police said Friday.

Acting on a tip, Urbandale police and the Polk County Sheriff's Department
went to the Grimes home of Mark Kennis about 2:30 p.m. Friday. There,
police allegedly found Kennis and four other adults in the living room,
smoking manjuana in the presence of a 15-year-old.

Urbandale police Sgt. Jim Button said all five adults were arrested.
Authorities then searched the home and found apparent marijuana-growing
equipment, plus about a quarter-pound of processed marijuana.

Kennis, 51, also is host and producer of "Big People News," a show on
public access Channel 15 that focuses on perceived discrimination against
large people. When he ran for governor last year, he received 1,760 votes
to come in fifth place. In his campaign, he advocated letting farmers grow
marijuana as a cash crop.

Kennis and his son, David M. Kennis, 24, both face several charges,
including manufacturing marijuana and distributing it to a minor. Dan L.
Patterson, 24, of Grimes, and Chris E. Varnado, 29, and Tracey M. Varnado,
26, both of 618 E. Euclid Ave., Des Moines, were charged with conspiracy
with intent to distribute marijuana to a minor.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Marijuana As Medicine (A staff editorial in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about
the Institute of Medicine report says that if reason and compassion trumped
politics, the fears of the drug warriors would be realized. But the U.S.
government is so invested in a drug war that has targeted marijuana as an
irredeemable enemy that it is unlikely to be moved by the new evidence. A
polite thank you and an acknowledgment that more study is necessary is the
standard response.)

Date: Sun, 21 Mar 1999 11:17:13 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US: MMJ: Marijuana As Medicine
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: General Pulaski
Pubdate: Sat, 20 Mar 1999
Source: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (PA)
Copyright: 1999 PG Publishing.
Contact: letters@post-gazette.com
Website: http://www.post-gazette.com/

MARIJUANA AS MEDICINE

A Report Challenges Simplistic Opposition To The Idea

Anti-drug activists fear the day that pharmaceutical instructions
will read: "Take one in the morning and one at bedtime and don't
Bogart that joint."

If reason and compassion trumped politics, their fears would be realized.

The evidence continues to pile up that under certain conditions and
for certain patients, smoking marijuana can have a medically
beneficial function.

It is particularly effective in stopping nausea and boosting appetite
and has therefore been sought after by some cancer patients hoping to
relieve the side effects of chemotherapy and AIDS patients trying to
ward off debilitating weight loss. It is also useful in diminishing
muscle spasms that afflict individuals with multiple sclerosis.

The latest verification of the potential medical benefits of marijuana
came from the Institute of Medicine, a branch of the National Academy
of Sciences, which conducted the exhaustive two-year study at the
behest of the federal government. The review also found no evidence
that marijuana leads to the use of harder drugs.

The 11 scientists who issued the report cautioned that the identified
benefits of the drug are limited by the toxic effects of the smoke,
which they found to be potentially more dangerous than cigarette
smoke. And they said that eventually an effective alternative delivery
system (maybe a patch or inhalant) should be developed.

But in the meantime, the panel felt that it is justified to prescribe
marijuana in carefully circumscribed circumstances for individuals
who cannot find relief through other sources.

The government, so invested in a drug war that has targeted marijuana
as an irredeemable enemy, is unlikely to be moved by the new
evidence. A polite thank you and an acknowledgment that more study is
necessary is the standard response.

Opponents of the medical use of marijuana argue that some who champion
that cause are really interested in an across-the-board legalization.
That is no doubt true. But the motives of proponents do not make a
good idea bad.

Anti-drug crusaders also fear that any recognition of a positive use
for marijuana will send adolescents into a pot-smoking frenzy. "It
sends the wrong message" is the refrain. But what kind of message are
we sending when we let thousands of people suffer who could otherwise
be helped?

Maturing means understanding nuances and contexts, and parents must
help their children in developing those higher level skills. That
means it's OK for Mom and Dad to have a glass of wine at dinner, but
not OK for their 14-year-old son to go on a beer-drinking binge with
friends. It's OK to administer morphine and other narcotics to sick
people, but not OK to shoot up in the alley. It's OK to give
marijuana to an AIDS patient who is wasting away, but not OK to give
it to a 15-year-old at a party.

That's not a terribly complex dichotomy to explain. And the payoff for
thousands whose suffering can be alleviated is unquestionably worth
it.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Class Action Goes To Trial (The best critique yet of the Institute of
Medicine report comes in a message forwarded from Lawrence Elliott Hirsch,
the lawyer representing the plaintiffs in a class-action federal lawsuit
filed in Philadelphia against the government's ban on medical marijuana. "It
is our contention that the binding agreement between the first legal
recipient Robert Randall and the government of the United States created a
law and a policy that bound the United States government to supply medical
marijuana to all citizens who have a medical need to use cannabis. . . . This
report, however, lacks any substantial foundation. The very first question
that should have been addressed by the IOM was the establishment of the
Compassionate Access Program, which was started in 1978. . . . I was
particularly disturbed at the report's suggestion that medical marijuana is
not a good medical treatment for glaucoma. Robert Randall received
therapeutic cannabis for glaucoma, as a medical necessity. Elvy Musikka, the
third legal recipient, had her eyesight saved by therapeutic cannabis
supplied by the government. Corrine Millet of Nebraska also is a legal
recipient for glaucoma. The government intentionally failed to perform any
research or analysis of any of the legal recipients because it never wanted
the research to be on the books and subject to disclosure to the public.")

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 17:40:08 -0800
From: "James R. Dawson" (jrdawson@gnv.fdt.net)
Organization: FAIRLAW.ORG
To: "James R. Dawson" (jrdawson@gnv.fdt.net)
Subject: Class Action Goes To Trial--Journey for Justice Advances! IOM?

Judge Katz notified us that our case will proceed to trial in late June 1999.

The plaintiffs, as a whole, and all counsel are pleased with the prompt trial
listing. We are expecting that each of the plaintiffs will take the witness
stand to explain to Judge Katz their medical history, and the therapeutic
relief derived from either smoked or otherwise ingested cannabis. We expect
our team of medical experts to be national in scope. We expect to call as
expert witnesses all of the surviving recipients of legal medical marijuana
to demonstrate medical necessity. Of course, documentary evidence which we
will receive from the government is critical. It is our contention that the
binding agreement between the first legal recipient Robert Randall and the
government of the United States created a law and a policy that bound the
United States government to supply medical marijuana to all citizens who have
a medical need to use cannabis. The smoking gun is the Randall settlement
agreement, which was signed by authorized representatives of the US
government. Like the Compassionate Access Program, the government has
secreted and covered up its Medical Marijuana Exception to total marijuana
Prohibition.

With respect to the IOM report, we acknowledge the exposure of partial truths
and helpful truths. The report certainly contributes to the advancement of
all medical marijuana advocacy. This report, however, lacks any substantial
foundation. The very first question that should have been addressed by the
IOM was the establishment of the Compassionate Access Program, which was
started in 1978. The report apparently ignores this essential factor. One can
only hope that this glaring omission is mere or sheer incompetence, and not a
part of the massive government cover-up of its policy to supply medical
marijuana to now just eight Americans.

I was particularly disturbed at the report's suggestion that medical
marijuana is not a good medical treatment for glaucoma. Robert Randall
received therapeutic cannabis for glaucoma, as a medical necessity. Elvy
Musikka, the third legal recipient, had her eyesight saved by therapeutic
cannabis supplied by the government. Corrine Millet of Nebraska also is a
legal recipient for glaucoma. The government intentionally failed to perform
any research or analysis of any of the legal recipients because it never
wanted the research to be on the books and subject to disclosure to the
public.

Additionally, I am once again disappointed and agitated by the medical
Establishment {per IOM} relegating historical medical marijuana users to
anecdotal status. As I have said before, each individual is the best clinical
observer of their own health condition. The stringent research proposed in
the report proposed government sponsored "research" conducted by a non-
responsive (nor responsible) bureaucracy is a complete waste of money and
time - leading inevitably to more government control, and less freedoms for
Americans. We are insured in the class action lawsuit that Judge Katz will
not treat our plaintiffs as mere anecdotes. In courtroom 13-B at the United
States Courthouse in Philadelphia the Truth will be placed into evidence, and
the government lies and cover-up will be exposed to the public.

Lawrence Elliott Hirsch

***

SOLICITATION FOR FUNDS FOR UPCOMING CLASS ACTION TRIAL
TO BEGIN IN LATE JUNE 1999

***

Dear Contributor to the Cause of Freedom,

The members of the Class Action Lawsuit extend their deep appreciation for
your support. The outpouring of assistance to help the plaintiffs attend
their first Federal Court Hearing (March 3, 1999) in Philadelphia far
exceeded even our greatest expectations. With your help, in a period of less
than two weeks, we were able to raise funds/ gather frequent flyer miles /
locate willing drivers enough to implement travel plans for approximately
70 patients who are plaintiffs in the Class Action Lawsuit. Thank you so
much!

Most of the members of the class arrived in Philadelphia on Tuesday, the 2nd
of March which was the day before the Court Hearing. They were accommodated
in the Best Western Hotel. Following the Hearing, all those who had been in
Court proceeded to take pictures in front of the Liberty Bell. At noon, over
100 guests attended a Luncheon of abundant and delicious foods. Speakers
included many of the patients, who continuously expressed their appreciation
for being able to attend.

This group of people is representative of the pain and anguish of so many
citizens throughout this country. Their suffering has been inhumanely
disregarded by those with power. By helping the action class, you have helped
all of us move closer to justice. As we progress in this lawsuit, it is
important to understand the value of your gifts. It has given us back the
feeling that to be a part of this country can be quite a magnificent
experience.

When the People are United all things are possible.

IMPORTANT: On March 16, 1999 Honorable Marvin Katz issued the Order that
THE TRIAL OF KIYOSHI KUROMIYA, AND OTHERS, AS PLAINTIFFS AGAINST THE UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA shall begin sometime on or about the 21st Day of June,
1999. Discovery Cutoff is May 17, 1999.

Remember:

We are a grassroots convergence OF the people. Funding the actions of the
class BY the people Allowing us to work FOR the people.

Judge Katz will allow expert testimony. He will allow plaintiff testimony. He
is giving us the opportunity to finally speak our piece! We will continue to
need your generous support for our research, for travel and accommodations,
for printing and mailing, and whatever expenses need to be incurred to win
this battle against ignorance and intolerance. Thank you, again, Joan Bello.

Go to the link below to print out the Gift Transmittal for
purposes of sending in a donation!

GIFT TRANSMITTAL ( go here for form )
http://gnv.fdt.net/~jrdawson/GIFT_TRANSMITTAL.htm

All checks can be made out to: Lifeservices, POB 4314, Boca
Raton, FL 33429

Here is my contribution to support the class Action Lawsuit!
Please make checks payable to Lifeservices.

Donation: $25 ____ $450 ____ $100 ____ $1000 ____ Other ____

Donor's Name ___________________________
Address ______________________________
City/State/Zip ___________________________

Please Mail your Contribution:
Lifeservices
POB 4314
Boca Raton, FL 33429

***

I can be reached at ICQ29950171

It is not about legalizing marijuana; it is about legalizing freedom.
(Richard Cowan)

The "Action Class" for the Freedom of Therapeutic Cannabis 1997-98-99
http://www.fairlaw.org

We are an "Action Class" which connotes non-passive, lawful,
dynamic forward movement, in concert with each other, continually
forming alliances and growing toward the ideal of freedom and equality
for all.

We are a grassroots convergence OF the people. Funding the actions of the
class BY the people. Allowing us to work FOR the people!

http://gnv.fdt.net/~jrdawson/class_plea_for_members.htm

***

SOLICITATION FOR FUNDS FOR UPCOMING CLASS ACTION TRIAL
TO BEGIN IN LATE JUNE 1999
http://gnv.fdt.net/~jrdawson/solicitation_funds_for_june.htm

The government's own programs PROVE that marijuana is a safe and effective
medicine! There are currently Eight(8) Human Test Subjects that are
provided marijuana from the Governments own Pot Farm. Am I so different
from them that I am denied equal access to this most beneficial
medicinal herb?

***

Will Foster 93 sentence slashed to 20 Years by appeals court Judge!
(It's still about 19 3/4 years to long!)

See http://www.gnv.fdt.net/~jrdawson/willsrelease.htm

***

Will's Parole DENIED!!

It's official. On January 20th notification was received that Governor
Keating had refused Will's parole. This is a slap in the face to common
sense and equal justice....Write the Governor of Oklahoma and tell him
what you think about his refusal to sign Will Fosters' Parole Papers

http://www.gnv.fdt.net/~jrdawson/willparole.htm

Free Will Foster NOW!
-------------------------------------------------------------------

The humane approach (A staff editorial in the Savannah Morning News, in
Georgia, about the recent Institute of Medicine report on medical marijuana
notes the IOM already concluded in 1982 that the active ingredients in
marijuana could help seriously ill patients and should be studied at greater
length. Perversely, the newspaper contradicts the 1999 report by asserting
that marijuana is a stepping stone to harder drugs. But it also agrees
scientific studies should go forward, and if the efficacy of medical cannabis
stands up to scrutiny, "then the humane response is to make marijuana
accessible to those who will benefit.")

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 10:44:18 -0600
From: "Frank S. World" (compassion23@geocities.com)
From: "CRRH mailing list" (restore@crrh.org)
Organization: Rx Cannabis Now!
http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/Lobby/7417/
To: editor (editor@mapinc.org), Med Mj (medmj@drcnet.org),
restore (restore@crrh.org)
Subject: US GA: Editorial: The humane approach
Source: Savannah Morning News (GA)
Website http://www.savannahnow.com/
Email tbarton@premierweb.net
http://www.savannahmorningnews.com/smn/special/vox.html
Pubdate: 20 March 1999

EDITORIAL: THE HUMANE APPROACH

MARIJUANA APPEARS to have substantial medical benefits for people with
cancer or AIDS. The influential Institute of Medicine wisely called this
week for more extensive scientific trials to determine how best to use it.

This is a moderate and cautious approach on a subject that arouses
considerable heat and often too little light.

Drug abuse has a detrimental impact on American society. But so does serious
illness.

The medical benefits of marijuana are not news. As far back as 1982, the
Institute of Medicine, a branch of the National Academy of Sciences,
concluded that the active ingredients in marijuana could have positive
impacts on the seriously ill and should be studied.

Unfortunately, marijuana is a stepping stone to other serious and addictive
drugs. Researchers have been reluctant to do the amount of study that's
necessary.

But this new report, from a credible government institution, could help
change perceptions. If marijuana can be shown to help the seriously ill live
better lives, it should be made available to them in a controlled setting.
In other words, administer the drug under a doctor's supervision.

The U.S. government currently provides free marijuana cigarettes to eight
participants in a program approved by the National Institute on Drug Abuse
and the Food and Drug Administration. The marijuana helps these patients
manage pain, nausea and other symptoms.

If there are others who could benefit from the drug, then it should be made
available to them, under the same limits and controls put on other
substances that can be misused.

All drugs are susceptible to misuse. But they also have proved to be
medically beneficial when administered responsibly. Marijuana, an illegal
substance, can have the same value.

Certainly, the illegal use of marijuana cannot be condoned. However,
scientific studies of its medical use should go forward. If its value stands
up to scrutiny, then the humane response is to make marijuana accessible to
those who will benefit.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Federal Report Supports Case For Legalizing Medical 'Pot' (A staff editorial
in Florida Today summarizes last week's Institute of Medicine report, and
concludes Florida needs to join the growing list of states that have
legalized the medicinal use of marijuana.)

Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 09:51:30 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US FL: MMJ: Federal Report Supports Case For Legalizing
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: General Pulaski
Pubdate: Sat, 20 Mar 1999
Source: Florida Today (FL)
Copyright: 1999 FLORIDA TODAY
Contact: letters@brevard.gannett.com
Feedback: http://www.flatoday.com/letters.htm
Website: http://www.flatoday.com/

FEDERAL REPORT SUPPORTS CASE FOR LEGALIZING MEDICAL `POT'

The latest scientific report on marijuana is neither a blanket
endorsement of the plant nor a new warning about reefer madness.

Instead, "Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base" is a
thoughtful body of research by the National Science Foundation's Institute
of Medicine that helps put the hot-button issue of medicinal marijuana in
its proper perspective.

The report released Wednesday concluded that the chemicals in
marijuana could serve as effective pain-relievers in a new generation
of medications, but cautioned that smoking the weed is harmful and
that more research on the medical uses of marijuana is needed.

"Marijuana's medical effects are generally modest, and for most
symptoms there are more effective medicines already available on the
market," said researcher John Benson Jr., dean and professor of
medicine emeritus, Oregon Health Sciences University School of
Medicine, Portland.

The researchers found that marijuana was not very useful in combatting
the effects of glaucoma, migraine headaches or movement disorders
such as Parkinson's disease. But and perhaps most significant for
public officials in Florida and across the nation - the researchers
also found that for some seriously ill patients, the benefits of
smoking marijuana outweigh its harmful effects.

"For patients who do not respond well to other medications, however,
short-term marijuana use appears to be suitable in treating
conditions like chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, or the
wasting caused by AIDS," Benson said.

Terry Green, a counselor for Project Response in Melbourne, said some
local AIDS patients already use a legal drug, made from the key
ingredient in marijuana to counteract the nausea and loss of appetite
caused by the disease or various treatments.

"We have several clients that use the drug, and we know a lot of our
clients have smoked marijuana because it was the only way they could
get rid of the nausea and develop an appetite," said Green, who added
that Project Response does not condone the use of illegal drugs.

In light of the new report from the prestigious scientific academy,
Florida needs to join the growing list of states that have legalized
the medicinal use of marijuana by people who are seriously ill.

Those states include California, Arizona, Alaska, Colorado, Nevada,
Washington and Oregon.

Undertaken carefully, a similar effort in Florida would be a humane
and sensible gesture.

Note:

To access the National Academy of Sciences report on medical uses of
marijuana, go to http://www2.nas.edu/iom
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Health Care Science Is Needed (An editorial by the drug warriors on the staff
of the Florida Times-Union tries to put a negative spin on the Institute of
Medicine report. Like other American media, the Times-Union notes the IOM
report "warned that smoking marijuana can cause respiratory disease and lung
cancer," but, like the report, it fails to note no cases of cancer or other
lung disease have been linked to smoking the herb after 5,000 years of
recorded use. The newspaper alleges "Head shops have sprung up all over
California" as a direct result of Proposition 215. "Anyone can walk in with a
slip of paper that says they need pot, and get it.")

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 11:09:47 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US FL: Editorial: Health Care Science Is Needed
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: General Pulaski
Pubdate: Sat, 20 Mar 1999
Source: Florida Times-Union (FL)
Copyright: The Florida Times-Union 1999
Contact: jaxstaff@jacksonville.com
Website: http://www.times-union.com/
Forum: http://cafe.jacksonville.com/cafesociety.html

HEALTH CARE SCIENCE IS NEEDED

Before those seeking to legalize marijuana get too carried away spreading
the message that pot is a miracle drug, it is worth noting that the
Institute of Medicine report being hailed as proof of marijuana's medicinal
properties falls far short of proving anything.

The active ingredients in marijuana may help fight pain and nausea and
therefore deserve to be tested in scientific trials, an advisory panel to
the federal government said after reviewing available evidence.

That's only what the nation's doctors and others have said for some time.

But the parts of the report that got slighted also were of interest.

The panel warned that smoking marijuana can cause respiratory disease and
lung cancer.

"Marijuana has potential as medicine, but it is undermined by the fact that
patients must inhale harmful smoke," said Stanley Watson of the Mental
Health Research Institute at the University of Michigan, one of the study's
principal investigators.

Of course, in the case of terminally ill patients, that would be of little
concern, if it had other benefits.

While it also has been promoted as a treatment for glaucoma, the panel said
smoked marijuana only temporarily reduces some of the eye pressure
associated with that disease.

Some of those seeking to legalize marijuana callously are using the plight
of the terminally ill as a ruse. They want to make it available to everyone,
on demand.

That has been the effect of "medical marijuana" laws passed in other states.

In the past few years, voters in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado,
Nevada, Oregon and Washington have approved measures in support of medical
marijuana.

Head shops have sprung up all over California. Anyone can walk in with a
slip of paper that says they need pot, and get it. Little, if any, policing
is done to determine whether the slip was signed by a physician. Actual
prescriptions are not required.

The proposal being formulated for the ballot in Florida is much the same. It
is far too broad.

The most reasonable course at this point:

Do the scientific research. Confirm that marijuana is of greater benefit to
cancer and AIDS patients than other drugs now available. Develop a way to
develop the medicine in a form that does not require smoking. Then make it
available to them by prescription from a licensed physician.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Actions are louder with words! (A list subscriber posts a few URLs for sites
featuring contact information for state and federal representatives, as well
as attorneys general, and asks you to write letters to the upholders of
prohibition regarding the Institute of Medicine report.)

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 11:30:32 -0400
From: aahpat (aahpat@enter.net)
From: "CRRH mailing list" (restore@crrh.org)
Reply-To: aahpat@enter.net
To: "restore@crrh.org" (restore@crrh.org)
Subject: Actions are louder with words!

People;

Many have made good points that you should be making to your
representatives and law enforcers about the Institute of Medicine
summery that was released this past week. You can get the contact
addresses for your state and federal representatives at:

http://www.vote-smart.org/ VOTE SMART

Remember, it has been the police officials, the district attorneys and
the attorneys general, as professional witnesses to the legislatures and
the congress, over the years, who have advocated these laws based on bad
science and faulty thinking. They are the people who can change this
situation the fastest and bring a measure of true justice to America. So
here is a site that has the addresses and contact information for all of
the Attorneys General across the nation.

http://www.naag.org/aglinks.htm Attorneys General contact info.

You can also get the address of your local district attorneys and lobby
them to lobby your state legislatures.

I would recommend that you go to the IOM site and get an HTML copy of
the report summery and attach it to the letters that you write to
politicians and law enforcers. The report summery is at;
http://www2.nas.edu/iom/ Institute of Medicine.

Pat

aahpat@enter.net
http://www.enter.net/~aahpat/amend.htm
ad hoc Campaign for the Advancement of Reform by the Marijuana
Amendment, (CARMA). When we vote we make our own.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Republicans In Senate Unveil Their Crime Agenda (An Associated Press article
in the Orange County Register says the GOP unveiled a $17.5 billion bill
Friday that would impose tougher penalties for drug traffickers.)

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 17:47:43 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US: Wire: Republicans In Senate Unveil Their Crime Agenda
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: John W. Black
Pubdate: March 20, 1999
Source: Orange County Register (CA)
Copyright: 1999 The Orange County Register
Contact: letters@link.freedom.com
Website: http://www.ocregister.com/
Section: News page, 17
Author: Laurie Kellman-The Associated Press

REPUBLICANS IN SENATE UNVEIL THEIR CRIME AGENDA

Government: The bill would impose tougher penalties for drug traffickers
and include millions of dollars in grants.

Washington- Millions of dollars in crime-fighting grants to local law
enforcement would be preserved and tougher penalties for drug
traffickers imposed under a $17.5 billion bill unveiled Friday, Senate
Republican said.

"It is based on what we know reduces crime," said Sen. Orrin Hatch,
R-Utah, chairman of the Judiciary Committee.

Hatch clashed with Attorney General Janet Reno last week on her
proposal to cut several anti-crime grants from her budget proposal.
Reno said crime was down significantly nationwide, and she wanted to
shift money to other priorities.

But Hatch said Friday that crime in the United States is still
"significantly high by historical standards," and violent crime rates
here remain the highest of any industrialized nation.

Much of the funding in Hatch's "21st Century Justice Act" is set aside
for grant programs that Reno wants eliminated, the chairman told reporters.

The programs in dispute are:

The Local Law Enforcement Block Grant Program, which congressional
Republicans first proposed in their 1994 election blueprint, the
"Contract With America." Since 1996, the program has provided more
than $1 billion a year to state and local governments for equipment
and technology.

Truth-in-sentencing grants, which would give states some $700 million
a year to build prisons to house violent and repeat criminals for at
least 85 percent of their sentences. Many states, Hatch said, already
have changed their laws to accommodate the program.

The Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grant, which would give
states $450 million a year to build detention centers, perform drug
testing and improve record-keeping for young offenders.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Senate Republicans Challenge Reno's Bid To Cut Money For Fighting Crime
(A lengthier version in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer)

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 17:48:43 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US: Senate Republicans Challenge Reno's Bid To Cut Money For
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: John Smith
Pubdate: Sat, 20 Mar 1999
Source: Seattle Post-Intelligencer (WA)
Copyright: 1999 Seattle Post-Intelligencer.
Contact: editpage@seattle-pi.com
Website: http://www.seattle-pi.com/
Author: Laurie Kellman, The Associated Press

SENATE REPUBLICANS CHALLENGE RENO'S BID TO CUT MONEY FOR FIGHTING CRIME

WASHINGTON -- Millions of dollars in crime-fighting grants to local
law enforcement would be preserved and tougher penalties for drug
traffickers imposed under a $17.5 billion bill unveiled yesterday,
Senate Republicans said.

"It is based on what we know reduces crime," said Sen. Orrin Hatch,
R-Utah, chairman of the Judiciary Committee.

Hatch clashed with Attorney General Janet Reno last week on her
proposal to cut several anti-crime grants from her budget proposal.
Reno said crime was down significantly nationwide, and she wanted to
shift money to other priorities.

But Hatch said yesterday that crime in the United States is still
"significantly high by historical standards," and violent crime rates
here remain the highest of any industrialized nation.

Much of the money in Hatch's "21st Century Justice Act" is set aside
for grant programs that Reno wants eliminated, the chairman told reporters.

The programs in dispute are:

* The Local Law Enforcement Block Grant Program, which congressional
Republicans first proposed in their 1994 election blueprint, the
"Contract With America." Since 1996, the program has provided more
than $1 billion a year to state and local governments for equipment
and technology.

* Truth-in-sentencing grants, which would give states some $700 million
a year to build prisons to house violent and repeat criminals for at
least 85 percent of their sentences. Many states, Hatch said, have
already changed their laws to accommodate the program.

* The Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grant, which would give
states $450 million a year to build detention centers, perform drug
testing and improve record-keeping for young offenders. Senate
Republican leadership sources said the bill marks a new willingness
among some senior Republicans to take on legislation that approaches
the gun-control issue.

Republicans, many of whom have opposed such legislation in recent
years, feared they would lose such a battle after nationally
publicized firearm tragedies at schools and elsewhere.

Hatch's agenda, however, faces little risk of igniting a gun battle
because it focuses primarily on the prosecutions, Republican sources
said.

It would expand a Richmond, Va., program in which the U.S. attorney
prosecutes as many local gun-related crimes in federal court as
possible and seeks federal mandatory minimum sentences. Hatch said
homicides in Richmond dropped 50 percent after that program took effect.

The legislation also includes a news media campaign to spread the
message that "an illegal gun will get you five years in federal prison."

Hatch said he plans a hearing on Monday on firearms prosecutions.

The bill also would:

* Extend federal laws against the murder of state and local law
enforcement officers to the murder by federal detainees of state
corrections officers.

* Add criminal penalties for recruiting minors for "a criminal street
gang" and toughen penalties for witness intimidation.

* Add penalties for teaching bomb making on the Internet.

* Provide state and local governments the resources and authority to
address emerging high-tech and international crime.

* Raise penalties for powder cocaine and methamphetamine offenses, and
make criminals liable for the cost of cleanup of their methamphetamine
labs.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Medical Marijuana: The Smoke Clears (The Economist, in Britain, says the
endorsement of medical marijuana recently issued by the Institute of Medicine
was expressed "in the most timid possible terms.")

Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 18:35:15 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: US: MMJ: Medical Marijuana: The Smoke Clears
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: D. Paul Stanford http://www.crrh.org/
Pubdate: Sat, 20 Mar 1999
Source: Economist, The (UK)
Copyright: 1999. The Economist Newspaper Limited.
Contact: letters@economist.com
Website: http://www.economist.com/

MEDICAL MARIJUANA: THE SMOKE CLEARS

SO FAR, seven American states have voted in favour of it. In Britain,
clinical trials are about to begin, and in Canada they have just been
authorised. Now, the Institute of Medicine, in Washington, DC, has
issued its report on the matter. It concludes, to nobody's great
surprise - though in the most timid possible terms - that marijuana is a
legitimate medical drug. It recommends further research, which is
reasonable. But it cannot quite steel itself to concede that, in the
face of the evidence that it presents, American doctors ought now to
be given the right to prescribe the stuff as freely as they would any
other medicine.

The report, which was commissioned in January 1997 by the White House
Office of National Drug Control Policy, looked at the effects of
smoked marijuana on all the diseases for which some consensus exists
that it might be beneficial. In cases of chemotherapy-induced nausea
and vomiting in cancer patients, and the wasting that accompanies
AIDS, the authors - John Benson of Oregon Health Sciences University
and Stanley Watson of the University of Michigan - agreed that the drug
was effective, and might sometimes be better than existing treatments.
That was also true for its use in treating the muscle spasms that are
associated with multiple sclerosis.

The authors disagreed, however, with the notion that it helped
glaucoma patients. The relief of pressure on the eyeball that
marijuana brings was thought too short-term to be useful.

There was also little comfort for those who had hoped that marijuana
would help with Parkinson's disease and Huntington's chorea.

As to the risks associated with marijuana use, the only one thought to
be outside the bounds of those normally acceptable in a medicine was
the deleterious effect of the smoke itself (it is like tobacco smoke).
So Dr Benson and Dr Watson recommended developing other ways of
delivering marijuana's active ingredients, while accepting that drug
companies might not necessarily think it worth their while doing this.

Moving beyond strictly therapeutic matters, the report also noted that
there was no evidence to suggest marijuana was a "gateway" to
other, more dangerous recreational drugs.

Most hard-drug users had, indeed, tried it before they moved on to
other substances. But they had experimented with legal drugs - ie,
tobacco and alcohol - before that (though usually at illegal ages). If
any drugs are gateways, therefore, it is these.

Try selling that idea to the distillers and cigarette companies.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Feds told to testify in pot use hearing (The Calgary Herald says Harry
Laforme, the Ontario judge presiding over the constitutional challenge of
AIDS patient Jim Wakeford, on Friday ordered a Health Canada official to
testify as to when the government plans to decide whether Wakeford can
legally use marijuana. Wakeford initially filed suit in February 1998.
Laforme ruled in September that Wakeford should seek immunity from
prosecution not through the courts but under section 56 of the Controlled
Drugs and Substances Act. However, Wakeford on Friday told the judge that did
not work. Wakeford's lawyer, Alan Young, said he wrote six letters to the
Department of Health asking for exemptions for Wakeford but received only one
reply that stated the department was looking into the "extraordinary
request.")

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 11:36:39 -0700
Subject: Feds told to testify in pot use hearing
From: "Debra Harper" (daystar1@home.com)
To: mattalk (mattalk@listserv.islandnet.com)
Newshawk: daystar1@home.com
Source: Calgary Herald
Pubdate: Saturday, March 20, 1999
Contact: letters@theherald.southam.ca
Author: Louise Surette

Feds told to testify in pot use hearing

An Ontario judge has ordered a Health Canada official to testify as to when
the federal government plans to decide whether an AIDS sufferer can legally
use marijuana.

Jim Wakeford, 54, was in an Ontario court Friday asking that his case
against the federal government to allow him to use marijuana to control the
side-effects of his AIDS medication be re-heard.

The initial lawsuit was launched in February 1998, with Wakeford arguing
that banning the use of marijuana violated the Charter of Rights and
Freedoms, but Justice Harry Laforme rejected that argument in September.

Laforme said Wakeford could apply for a formal exemption from prosecution
for using marijuana on grounds of medical use without going through the
courts under section 56 of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.

However, Wakeford says that did not work and was back in court Friday before
Laforme.

Wakeford's lawyer, Alan Young, said he has written six letters to the
Department of Health since the fall asking for exemptions for Wakeford. He
has received only one reply that stated the department was looking into the
"extraordinary request."

"Seven months with only one letter saying that they were looking into it
isn't acceptable," Young told Laforme.

The exemption is used usually for synthetic drugs, not plants, says Young,
and he doesn't think the government has a set rule for this type of request.

Two weeks ago Health Minister Allan Rock announced plans to conduct clinical
trials to see if marijuana can reduce pain in terminally ill patients.

Young says this proves the government is nowhere near having a plan on what
to do with people such as Wakeford.

"A dying man seeking a medicine that could help him live with some dignity
shouldn't have to wait for the government to develop a plan."

Young wants the case reopened on the basis that Laforme was misled into
believing the federal government might be willing to assist Wakeford.

LaForme said Friday he could not decide whether to reopen the case until he
knew for certain if the government would help Wakeford or not. He ordered an
official from Health Canada to travel to Toronto to testify.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

AIDS Victim Back In Court (The Toronto Star version)

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 14:11:38 -0800
From: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org (MAPNews)
To: mapnews@mapinc.org
Subject: MN: Canada: AIDS Victim Back In Court
Sender: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Reply-To: owner-mapnews@mapinc.org
Organization: Media Awareness Project http://www.mapinc.org/lists/
Newshawk: Dave Haans
Pubdate: Saturday, March 20, 1999
Source: The Toronto Star (Canada)
Copyright: 1999, The Toronto Star
Contact: lettertoed@thestar.com
Website: http://www.thestar.com/
Page: A12
Author: Wendy Darroch, Staff reporter

AIDS VICTIM BACK IN COURT

An AIDS sufferer who was told by a Toronto judge to seek a federal
exemption from prosecution for possessing marijuana for medical
reasons wants his case re-opened.

When Mr. Justice Harry LaForme told James Wakeford to apply for the
exemption, an option available under federal drug laws, he did not
realize it applies only to pharmaceuticals, not plant products,
Osgoode Hall law professor Alan Young told the Ontario court, general
division yesterday.

LaForme's decision was based on incomplete information, Young argued
before the judge. Last summer, Wakeford launched a civil lawsuit
against Ottawa for the right to use marijuana for medical purposes.

LaForme ruled that Wakeford's constitutional rights were, on the face
of it, violated by the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, but went
on to conclude that the act didn't undermine the principles of
fundamental justice, because Wakeford had yet to apply for a
ministerial exemption.

Crown counsel Kevin Wilson argued there are no grounds to reopen the
case. Young said he has written repeatedly to Health Minister Allan
Rock and that there was no provision for applicants asking for an
exemption for marijuana.

LaForme said he would like some evidence to be called before he
decides whether there are grounds to reopen the case. No new hearing
date was set.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Mayday press release text (A news release from the International Cannabis
Coalition publicizes worldwide rallies May 1 calling for the end to cannabis
prohibition. So far events are confirmed on four continents, in six countries
and seventeen cities.)

To: ukcia-l@mimir.com
From: webbooks@paston.co.uk (CLCIA)
From: "CRRH mailing list" (restore@crrh.org)
Subject: UK: mayday press release text
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 16:17:02 +0000

1. Press release text

International Cannabis Coalition

No Victim - No Crime - May 1st '99

Cannabis March & Festival Announced

A 'Celebration of Cannabis' march and one day international festival in
London and worldwide on May 1st 1999.

May Day (Sat May 1st 1999) will see worldwide action calling for the end to
cannabis prohibition. Cannabis campaigning groups from all over the world
including Britain have formed an 'International Cannabis Coalition' which
so far has pro cannabis May Day events confirmed on four continents, six
countries and seventeen cities.

In Britain a 'Celebration of Cannabis March' similar to last years
successful 'Independent on Sunday' pro cannabis march will assemble at 12
noon in Brixton, London and march to Clapham Common where a 'Celebration
of Cannabis Festival' will go on until 8.30 pm. Several regional events are
also planned; Edinburgh confirmed, Brighton expected.

London May Day Cannabis Programme:

* 12.00 noon: 'Celebration of Cannabis March' assembles 12 noon at Rush
Common, Brixton, London SW2. Tube: Brixton. Departs 12.30 pm for Clapham
Common arriving 1.15-1.30pm.

* 1.30 - 8.30 pm: 'Celebration of Cannabis Festival', Clapham Common,
London. The festival will include; speakers, live music, poets, comedians,
sound systems, circus performers, Hemp Exhibition, Cannabis medical
clinic, food, Hemp ice cream, Hemp Beer, videos, Hemp fashion show, Hemp
cake baking competition, kids area, a market area and internet links with
similar events worldwide.

'New Labour is continuing old drug policies that encourage drug abuse while
benefiting criminals. Cannabis prohibition is not sustainable ethically or
politically; it brings the law into disrepute, causes untold social and
economic damage and is being ignored by millions because they know the
truth.'

For more details phone: 0171 637 7467. Thank you.

Cannabis Coalition in Britain

The International Cannabis Coalition is supported in Britain by the
following cannabis campaigns:

Campaign Against Narcotic Abuse Because of Ignorance in Society (CANABIS).
"There have been too many civil and human rights abuses under the cover of
of the prohibition of the leaf. We demand an end to it" - Glen Jenkins,
spokesperson. Phone: 01582 750727.

Campaign to Legalise Cannabis International Association (CLCIA). "Cannabis
should be a matter of choice not law" - Tina Smith, spokesperson. Phone:
01603 625 780.

Cannabis In Avalon. "I support the total liberation of cannabis to help
save the future of the planet and all humanity" - Free Rob Cannabis,
coordinator. Phone: 01458 833 236.

Church of the Sacred Herb. 'Cannabis is a herb given by God for the benefit
of humanity' - Craig Capps. Phone C/o 01603 625780.

Green Party Drugs Group. "The war on drugs is in reality a war on drug
users, causing untold damage and corruption. We urge people to campaign,
come to this event, and at the Local and European elections vote for a
progressive drug policy. Smoke Green, Vote Green". Shane Collins,
spokesperson. Phone: 0181 671 5936.

London Medical Cannabis. "The plant saved my life. The weed freed my mind
and the seed freed my body" Tony Taylor, co ordinator. Phone: 0171 837 5223.

Transform. "Legalising Cannabis is an important first step towards a truly
effective drugs policy for the regulation and control of all drugs." Danny
Kushlick, Director. Phone: 0117 939 8052.

Legalise Cannabis Campaign Scotland. "Keeping Cannabis illegal is a waste
of taxpayers money" - Linda Hendry, coordinator (also Scottish Green Party
Drugs spokesperson). Phone: 0131 667 6488.

"Britain should be less a nation of shoppers and become more a nation of
gardeners instead" Mary Jane, coalition supporter.

International Cannabis Coalition, PO Box 2243, London, W1A 1YF, UK.
Voice: 0171 637 7467. Fax: 0870 054 8646. E mail: mayday@schmoo.co.uk
Website: http://www.schmoo.co.uk/mayday.htm

***

From: HSLotsof@aol.com
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 23:48:42 EST
To: "DRCTalk Reformers' Forum" (drctalk@drcnet.org)
Subject: Postcards - MMM event - NYC May 1, 1999
Reply-To: HSLotsof@aol.com
Sender: owner-drctalk@drcnet.org

People should be taking advantage of the great postcards available for the NYC
MMM event on May 1, 1999. Record, book and many other kinds of stores as well
as, some restaurants and bars have literature tables or racks and really are
glad to give space for leaving 50 MMM postcards or so. Persons provding the
postcards should ask permission to leave the cards and ask where they should
be placed. A lot of people are behind the MMM and are really glad to
cooperate.

Contact cnw@cures-not-wars.org (212) 677 7180 or your local MMM organizer to
get postcards - they are fantastic works of art. We had people who were
getting paid to hand out other flyers offer to hand out MMM cards on the
street. Get the word out.

Howard
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Weekly Action Report on Drug Policies, Year 5, No. 11 (A summary of European
and international drug policy news, from CORA, in Italy)

Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 18:18:16 +0100
To: CORAFax EN (cora.belgique@agora.stm.it)
From: CORAFax (cora.belgique@agora.stm.it)
From: "CRRH mailing list" (restore@crrh.org)
Subject: CORAFax #11 (EN)

ANTIPROHIBITIONIST OF THE ENTIRE WORLD ....
Year 5 #11, March 20 1999

***

Weekly Action Report on Drug Policies

Edited by the CORA - Radical Antiprohibitionist Coordination, federated to
- TRP-Transnational Radical Party (NGO, consultive status, I)
- The Global Coalition for Alternatives to the Drug War

***

director: Vincenzo Donvito
All rights reserved

***

http://www.agora.it/coranet
mailto:cora.news@agora.it

***

NEWS FROM THE WORLD

***

000536 13/03/99
OCEANIA / AUSTRALIA
ADDICITION
LA REPUBBLICA
Six Australian policemen have taken legal action against the Queensland
police. They claim that a mission, which had them infiltrate and spy the
world of drug pushers actually ended up turning them in to, addicts.

***

000535 13/03/99
AMERICA / CANADA
HEALTH
LA REPUBBLICA
The Canadian Minister of Health has approved the beginning for the
experimentation of therapeutic use of marijuana, which will be given to
patients just as any normal medicine. Timing and premises of this
experiment are still to be decided.

***

000531 11/03/99
EUROPE / SWITZERLAND
INITIATIVE
EL PAIS
The Andalusian Institute of Criminology officially reports on the outcome
of the Swiss project for controlled distribution of heroin: crimes
committed by drug addicts have gone down by 60%, while convictions have
gone down by 80%.

***

000532 17/03/99
E.U. / FRANCE
INITIATIVE
L'EXPRESS
In France there are 33 first aid centres for drug addicts. Clean hypodermic
needles and someone who will tend an ear to their problems are certainly
valid contributions to the general cause of harm reduction, but what's
really missing is an effective prevention plan.

***

000533 15/03/99
E.U.
INITIATIVE
IL GIORNALE
The Green party has distributed to all members of the European Parliament a
leaflet in favour of therapeutic use of heroin rising much protest,
especially from their colleagues from Forza Italia, the center-right wing
party.

***

000539 16/03/99
E.U. / GERMANY
INITIATIVE
FRANKFURTER
The CDU/CSU is ready to support the Government's project of controlled
distribution of heroin, but is still against legalisation of light drugs,
as proposed by the Green and Social Democrat Parties.

***

000538 16/03/99
E.U. / ITALY
JUSTICE
IL SOLE 24 ORE
Confcommercio (one of Italy's major commerce associations) has sounded an
alarm about the official figures regarding money laundering: In Italy drugs
produce a gross amount of 160 billion Lire, and only 2% is recovered. The
various Mafia organisations are in control of about 20% of the general market.

***

000534 11/03/99
MARKET
FRANKFURTER
German authorities say that during the past fifteen years Europe has
changed from being an importer to being an exporter of synthetic drugs,
especially towards Florida, California and New York.

***

000537 15/03/99
AMERICA / USA
WAR ON DRUGS
HERALD TRIBUNE /
General McCaffrey, in charge of anti drug policies, complains about lack
of tangible results. Editorialist Timothy Egan's opinion is that
prohibitionism is ruining America.

***

000540 17/03/99
AMERICA
WAR ON DRUGS
HERALD TRIBUNE
After having infiltrated the world of drug traffickers, a number of
American secret agents claim to have discovered suspicious facts about the
Mexican War Minister.

***

000541 22/03/99
ASIA / AFGHANISTAN
WAR ON DRUGS
TIME
The Talibans had announced that they would have destroyed all heroin
refineries on the border with Pakistan, but the journalists who were called
to report on this only found piles of roubles and a sparse group of workers.

***

CORAFax 1999

-------------------------------------------------------------------

[End]

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